The Sound of Two Hands Clapping: The Education of a Tibetan Buddhist Monk

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University of California Press, 28 .. 2003 - 460 ˹
A unique insider's account of day-to-day life inside a Tibetan monastery, The Sound of Two Hands Clapping reveals to Western audiences the fascinating details of monastic education. Georges B. J. Dreyfus, the first Westerner to complete the famous Ge-luk curriculum and achieve the distinguished title of geshe, weaves together eloquent and moving autobiographical reflections with a historical overview of Tibetan Buddhism and insights into its teachings.

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辺Ԩó 觢ŷ

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IV
30
V
52
VI
77
VII
96
VIII
109
IX
147
X
162
XI
181
XIV
227
XV
265
XVI
293
XVII
304
XVIII
323
XIX
333
XX
399
XXI
417

XIII
193

Ѻ - ٷ

շ辺

˹ 185 - But', says Derrida the supplement supplements. It adds only to replace. It intervenes or insinuates itself in-the-place-of: if it fills, it is as if one fills a void, if it represents and makes an image, it is by the anterior default of a presence. Compensatory and vicarious, the supplement is an adjunct, a subaltern instance which takes (the) place.
˹ 98 - In a discipline, unlike in commentary, what is supposed at the point of departure is not some meaning which must be rediscovered, nor an identity to be reiterated; it is that which is required for the construction of new statements. For a discipline to exist, there must be the possibility of formulating and of doing so ad infinitum fresh propositions.
˹ 267 - As the art of asking questions, dialectic proves its value because only the person who knows how to ask questions is able to persist in his questioning, which involves being able to preserve his orientation toward openness. The art of questioning is the art of questioning ever further ie, the art of thinking. It is called dialectic because it is the art of conducting a real dialogue.
˹ 185 - As substitute, it is not simply added to the positivity of a presence, it produces no relief, its place is assigned in the structure by the mark of an emptiness.
˹ 334 - Johannes Fabian, Time and the Other: How Anthropology Makes Its Object (New York: Columbia University Press, 1983); James Clifford, The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth-Century Ethnography, Literature, and Art (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988).
˹ 183 - On the other hand, whatever the techniques employed, commentary's only role is to say finally, what has silently been articulated deep down. It must - and the paradox is ever-changing yet inescapable - say, for the first time, what has already been said, and repeat tirelessly what was, nevertheless, never said.
˹ 200 - ... which was transmitted at Sinai, no matter whether it was always known or whether it was forgotten and had to be rediscovered. The effort of the seeker after truth consists not in having new ideas but rather in subordinating himself to the continuity of the tradition of the Divine word and in laying open what he receives from it in the context of his own time. In other words: not system but commentary is the legitimate form through which truth is approached.
˹ 388 - ... all playing is a being-played. The attraction of a game, the fascination it exerts, consists precisely in the fact that the game tends to master the players.
˹ 366 - Until WRITING was invented, we lived in acoustic space, where all backward peoples still live: boundless, directionless, horizonless, the dark of the mind, the world of emotion, primordial intuition, mafiaridden. . .A goose quill put an end to talk, abolished mystery, gave us enclosed space and towns, brought roads and armies and bureaucracies. It was the basic metaphor with which the cycle of CIVILIZATION began, the step from the dark into the light of the mind.
˹ 366 - The oral word, as we have noted, never exists in a simply verbal context, as a written word does. Spoken words are always modifications of a total, existential situation, which always engages the body.

ǡѺ (2003)

Georges B. J. Dreyfus is Professor of Religion at Williams College. He is author of The Svatantrika-Prasangika Distinction: What Difference Does a Difference Make? (coedited with Sara McClintock, 2002), Recognizing Reality: Dharmakirti's Philosophy and Its Tibetan Interpretations (1997), and A Recent Rediscovery: rGyal tshap's Rigs gter rnam bshad (in collaboration with S. Onoda, 1994).

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