Handbook of Early Childhood Intervention

˹
Jack P. Shonkoff, Samuel J. Meisels
Cambridge University Press, 22 .. 2000 - 734 ˹
This second edition of the Handbook of Early Childhood Intervention provides a comprehensive overview of this complex and continually evolving field by an outstanding group of contributing authors. Eighteen of the twenty-eight chapters are new to this edition; chapters from the first edition have been updated. It combines rigorous scholarship with state-of-the-art content on policy and service delivery. It is designed to address a broad, multidisciplinary audience including psychologists, early childhood educators, social workers, pediatricians, nurses, child psychiatrists, physical and occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, and professionals interested in public health and social policy. The Handbook is a valuable resource for both graduate students and experienced professionals.

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Early Childhood Intervention A Continuing Evolution
3
Concepts of Developmental Vulnerability and Resilience
33
Neurological Basis of Developmental Vulnerability
35
Adaptive and Maladaptive Parenting Perspectives on Risk and Protective Factors
54
The Human Ecology of Early Risk
76
Cultural Differences as Sources of Developmental Vulnerabilities and Resources
94
Protective Factors and Individual Resilience
115
Theoretical Frameworks for Intervention
133
Early Care and Education Current Issues and Future Strategies
339
Early Childhood Intervention for LowIncome Children and Families
361
Services for Young Children with Disabilities and Their Families
387
Early Childhood Mental Health Services A Policy and Systems Development Perspective
416
Paraprofessionals Revisited and Reconsidered
439
Personnel Preparation for Early Childhood Intervention Programs
454
Measuring the Impact of Service Delivery
485
An Expanded View of Program Evaluation in Early Childhood Intervention
487

Transactional Regulation The Developmental Ecology of Early Intervention
135
Guiding Principles for a Theory of Early Intervention A DevelopmentalPsychoanalytic Perspective
160
Behavioral and Educational Approaches to Early Intervention
179
The Neurobiological Bases of Early Intervention
204
Approaches to Assessment
229
The Elements of Early Childhood Assessment
231
Assessment of ParentChild Interaction Implications for Early Intervention
258
Family Assessment Within Early Intervention Programs
290
Measurement of Community Characteristics
309
Service Delivery Models and Systems
325
Preventive Health Care and Anticipatory Guidance
327
Another Decade of Intervention for Children Who Are Low Income or Disabled What Do We Know Now?
510
Early Childhood Intervention Programs What About the Family?
549
Economics of Early Childhood Intervention
589
New Directions for the TwentyFirst Century
611
Early Childhood Intervention Policies An International Perspective
613
Evolution of FamilyProfessional Partnerships Collective Empowerment as the Model for the Early TwentyFirst Century
630
Resilience Reconsidered Conceptual Considerations Empirical Findings and Policy Implications
651
Name Index
683
Subject Index
708
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Edward Frank Zigler was born in Kansas City, Missouri on March 1, 1930. After serving in the Army during the Korean War, he received a bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas City in 1954 and a doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1958. He joined the Yale University faculty as an assistant professor of psychology in 1959. He was a psychologist who in the mid-1960s helped design Head Start. He was an early advocate of guaranteed time off from work for new parents, the teaching of child-rearing skills to teenagers, and the integration of health and social service programs and day care into neighborhood public school buildings. Under President Richard M. Nixon, Zigler was chief of the children's bureau of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare in early 1970. Within months the bureau became the Office of Child Development and he became its first permanent director. He was the author or editor of 40 books. He died from complications of coronary artery disease on February 7, 2019 at the age of 88.

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