Systems of Ethics ...

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Jennings & Pye, 1902 - 464 ˹
 

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˹ 36 - Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbor, and hate thine enemy. But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you and persecute you...
˹ 338 - Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; ie, waste nothing. 6. INDUSTRY Lose no time; be always employed in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. 7. SINCERITY Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
˹ 243 - Wash you, make you clean ; put away the evil of your doings from before mine eyes; Cease to do evil; learn to do well; Seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, Judge the fatherless, plead for the widow.
˹ 338 - TEMPERANCE. Eat not to dullness ; drink not to elevation. 2. SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself ; avoid trifling conversation.
˹ 337 - I concluded, at length, that the mere speculative conviction that it was our interest to be completely virtuous, was not sufficient to prevent our slipping ; and that the contrary habits must be broken, and good ones acquired and established, before we can have any dependence on a steady, uniform rectitude of conduct.
˹ 242 - Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? or who shall stand in his holy place? He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor swom deceitfully.
˹ 36 - Lord, who shall abide in Thy tabernacle? Who shall dwell in Thy holy hill? He that walketh uprightly, and worketh righteousness, And speaketh the truth in his heart.
˹ 322 - To make my position fully understood, it seems needful to add that, corresponding to the fundamental propositions of a developed moral science, there have been and still are developing in the race certain fundamental moral intuitions ; and that though these moral intuitions are the results of accumulated experiences of utility, gradually organised and inherited, they have come to be quite independent of conscious experience.
˹ 322 - I believe that the experiences of utility, organized and consolidated through all past generations of the human race, have been producing corresponding modifications, which, by continued transmission and accumulation, have become in us certain faculties of moral intuition...
˹ 337 - I had undertaken a task of more difficulty than I had imagined. While my attention was taken up and care employed in guarding against one fault, I was often surprised by another; habit took the advantage of inattention; inclination was sometimes too strong for reason.

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