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ANTHEM TO THE BLESSED VIRGIN. Hail Queen of Heaven ! Ave Regina coelorum, Hail Queen of Angels! Hail Ave Domina Angelorum : blest Root and Gate, from Salve Radix, salve Porta, which came Light upon the Ex qua mundo lux est orta ; world! Rejoice, O glorious Gaude, Virgo gloriosa, Virgin, that surpassest all in Super omnes speciosa : beauty! Hail most lovely Vale, o valde decora, Queen ! and pray to Christ for Et pro nobis Christum

Ň. Vouchsafe, O Holy Vir- V. Dignare me laudare gin, that I may praise thee. te, Virgo sacrata.

R. Give me power against B. Da mihi virtutem conthine enemies.

tra hostes tuos.

us.

exora.

LET US PRAY.

OREMUS.

Grant, O merciful God, thy Concede, misericors Deus, protection to us in our weak- fragilitati nostræ præsiness; that we who celebrate dium: ut, qui sanctæ Dei the memory of the Holy Genitricis memoriam agiMother of God, may, through mus,

intercessionis ejus the aid of her intercession, auxilio, a nostris iniquitatirise again from our sins. bus resurgamus. Per eumThrough the same Christ our dem Christum Dominum Lord.

nostrum. B. Amen.

B. Amen. 7. May the divine assist- Ñ. Divinum auxilium maance remain always with us. neat semper nobiscum. Bs. Amen.*

B. Amen.*

Then, in secret, Pater, Ave, and Credo; page 26.

* In the Monastic Rite, this Response is as follows: R. And with our absent Breth. R. Et cum fratribus nostris ren. Amen.

absentibus. Amen.

PROPER OF THE TIME.

PASSION SUNDAY.

To-day, if ye shall hear the Hodie, si vocem Domini voice of the Lord, harden not audieritis, nolite obdurare

corda vestra.

your hearts.

THE Holy Church begins her Night Office of this Sunday with these impressive words of the Royal Prophet. Formerly, the faithful considered it their duty to assist at the Night Office, at least on Sundays and Feasts; they would have grieved to have lost the grand teachings given by the Liturgy. Such fervour has long since died out; the assiduity at the Offices of the Church, which was the joy of our Catholic forefathers, has now become a thing of the past; and, even in countries which have not apostatised from the faith, the clergy have ceased to celebrate publicly Offices at which no one assisted. Excepting in Cathedral Churches and in Monasteries, the grand harmonious system of the Divine Praise has been abandoned, and the marvellous power of the Liturgy has no longer its full influence upon the Faithful.

This is our reason for drawing the attention of our readers to certain beauties of the Divine Office, which would otherwise be totally ignored. Thus, what can be more impressive than this solemn Invitatory of to-day's Matins, which the Church takes from one of the psalms, and which she repeats on every Feria between this and Maundy Thursday? She says: To-day, if ye shall hear the voice of the Lord, harden not your hearts! The sweet voice of your suffering Jesus now speaks to you, poor sinners! be not your own enemies by indifference and hardness of heart. The Son of God is about to give you the last and greatest proof of the love that brought him down from heaven; his Death is nigh at hand : men are preparing the wood for the immolation of the new Isaac : enter into yourselves, and let not your hearts, after being touched with grace, return to their former obduracy,—for nothing could be more dangerous. The great anniversaries we are to celebrate have a renovating power for those souls that faithfully correspond with the grace which is offered them ; but they increase insensibility in those who let them pass without working their conversion. To-day, therefore, if you hear the voice of the Lord, harden not your hearts !

During the preceding four weeks, we have noticed how the malice of Jesus' enemies has been gradually increasing. His very presence irritates them; and it is evident, that any little circumstance will suffice to bring the deep and long nurtured hatred to a bead. The kind and gentle manners of Jesus are drawing to him all hearts that are simple and upright; at the same time, the humble life he leads, and the stern purity of his doctrines, are perpetual sources of vexation and anger, both to the proud Jew that looks forward to the Messias being a mighty conqueror, and to the Pharisee, who corrupts the Law of God, that he may make it the instrument of his own base passions. Still, Jesus goes on working miracles; his discourses are more than ever energetic; his prophecies foretell the fall of Jerusalem, and such a destruction of its famous Temple, that not a stone is to be left on stone. The doctors of the Law should, at least, reflect upon what they hear; they should examine these wonderful works, which render

such strong testimony in favour of the Son of David, and they should consult those divine prophecies which, up to the present time, have been so literally fulfilled in his person. Alas! they themselves are about to carry them out to the very last iota. There is not a single outrage or suffering foretold by David and Isaias, as having to be put upon the Messias, which these blind men are not scheming to verify.

In them, therefore, was fulfilled that terrible saying: He that shall speak against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, nor in the world to come. The Synagogue is nigh to a curse. Obstinate in her error, she refuses to see or to hear; she has deliberately perverted her judgment: she has extinguished within herself the light of the Holy Spirit; she will go deeper and deeper into evil, and at length fall into the abyss. This same lamentable conduct is but too often witnessed now-a-days, in those sinners, who, by habitual resistance to the light, end by finding their happiness in sin. Neither should it surprise us, that we find in people of our own generation a resemblance to the murderers of our Jesus: the history of his Passion will reveal to us many sad secrets of the human heart and its perverse inclinations; for what happened in Jerusalem, happens also in every sinner's heart. His heart, according to the saying of St. Paul, is a Calvary, where Jesus is crucified. There is the same ingratitude, the same blindness, the same wild madness, with this difference, that the sinner who is enlightened by faith, knows Him whom he crucifies; whereas the Jews, as the same Apostle tells us, knew not the Lord of Glory. Wbilst, there

? fore, we listen to the Gospel, which relates the history of the Passion, let us turn the indignation, we feel for the Jews against ourselves and our

i St. Matth. xi. 32.

o I. Cor. ii. 8.

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