Essentials of English Composition

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辺Ԩó 觢ŷ

Formal Notes
20
Telegrams 17 18
22
DESCRIPTION
24
Brief Biography
25
Paragraph Writing
26
Description of Animals
28
Description of Things
31
Description of Persons
33
Descriptive Terms
39
Contrasted Descriptions
41
Description for Comparison
43
The Boyhood of Longfellow II Poems for Study III Hiawathas Childhood IV Longfellow and the Children
79
Poems to be Read
82
The Home of Longfellow
83
Biography of Longfellow VIII The Pictures of Puritan Life
85
The Courtship of Miles Standish
86
Evangeline
89
Subjects for Compositions XII Morituri Salutamus 85 85 86 89 91
91
STYLE
92
97 98 IOI 1 Natural Order in Declarative and Imperative Sentences II Natural Order in Interrogative Sentences III Use of Introductory Words
95
Natural Position of Modifiers
96
Natural Position of Adjective Modifiers
97
Natural Position of Adverbial Modifiers
98
Order of Emphasis Subject Emphatic
101
Predicate Adjective Emphatic
102
Object Emphatic
104
Adverbial Elements Emphatic
105
Style Its Qualities
107
Unity
108
Brevity Superfluous Words
111
Brevity Words Understood
112
Brevity Words instead of Phrases or Clauses
113
SECTION PAGE XVI Clearness
115
Ambiguity The Sentence
117
Ambiguity The Participle
118
Ambiguity The Personal Pronoun
119
Ambiguity The Relative Pronoun I 20
120
Attractiveness Similar Parts of Sentences
121
Attractiveness Repeated Words
124
Attractiveness Successive Sentences
126
Figures of Speech
127
Figures of Comparison The Simile
128
Figures of Comparison The Metaphor
130
Figures of Contrast Antithesis
134
Figures of Substitution Metonymy and Synec doche
137
Attributive Figures Personification
139
Attributive Figures Apostrophe and Vision
141
Miscellaneous Figures of Speech
144
28
146
33
147
41 43
148

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˹ 162 - They tell us, sir, that we are weak unable to cope with so formidable an adversary; but when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house ! Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction?
˹ 40 - I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils ; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay : Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
˹ 144 - I see before me the Gladiator lie : He leans upon his hand his manly brow Consents to death, but conquers agony ; And his droop'd head sinks gradually low ; And through his side the last drops, ebbing slow From the red gash, fall heavy, one by one, Like the first of a thunder shower ; and now The arena swims around him he is gone, Ere ceased the inhuman shout which hail'd the wretch who won.
˹ 164 - We have petitioned, we have remonstrated, we have supplicated, we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and parliament. Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded, and we have been spurned with contempt from the foot of the throne.
˹ 164 - Our revels now are ended... These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits, and Are melted into air, into thin air, And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve, And, like this insubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind: we are such stuff As dreams are made on; and our little life Is rounded with a sleep...
˹ 73 - OFTEN I think of the beautiful town That is seated by the sea ; Often in thought go up and down The pleasant streets of that dear old town, And my youth comes back to me. And a verse of a Lapland song Is haunting my memory still : " A boy's will is the wind's will, And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.
˹ 103 - Fair was she to behold, that maiden of seventeen summers. Black were her eyes as the berry that grows on the thorn by the wayside, Black, yet how softly they gleamed beneath the brown shade of her tresses!
˹ 220 - To gild refined gold, to paint the lily, To throw a perfume on the violet, To smooth the ice, or add another hue Unto the rainbow, or with taper-light To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to garnish, Is wasteful, and ridiculous excess.
˹ 157 - And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud : for he is a god ; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.
˹ 245 - What writest thou?" The vision raised its head, And, with a look made of all sweet accord, Answered, ' The names of those who love the Lord.

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