Pictures of Arctic Travel: Greenland

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G.W. Carleton, 1881 - 144 ˹
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˹ 50 - To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell, To slowly trace the forest's shady scene, Where things that own not man's dominion dwell, And mortal foot hath ne'er or rarely been ; To climb the trackless mountain all unseen, With the wild flock that never needs a fold ; Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean ; This is not solitude ; 'tis but to hold Converse with Nature's charms, and view her stores unroll'd.
˹ 29 - While fancy, like the finger of a clock, Runs the great circuit, and is still at home.
˹ 51 - I live not in myself, but I become Portion of that around me : and to me, High mountains are a feeling...
˹ 94 - Nature! great parent! whose unceasing hand Rolls round the Seasons of the changeful year, How mighty, how majestic, are thy works!
˹ 10 - Where rose the mountains, there to him were friends ; Where roll'd the ocean, thereon was his home ; Where a blue sky, and glowing clime, extends, He had the passion and the power to roam ; The desert, forest, cavern, breaker's foam, Were unto him companionship ; they spako A mutual language, clearer than the tome Of his land's tongue, which he would oft forsake For Nature's pages glass'd by sunbeams on the lake.
˹ 37 - We figure to ourselves The thing we like, and then we build it up As chance will have it, on the rock or sand : For thought is tired of wandering o'er the world, And homebound Fancy runs her bark ashore.
˹ 10 - Where a blue sky, and glowing clime, extends, He had the passion and the power to roam ; The desert, forest, cavern, breaker's foam, Were unto him companionship ; they spake A mutual language, clearer than the tome 115 Of his land's tongue, which he would oft forsake For Nature's pages glassed by sunbeams on the lake.
˹ 143 - ... the look of England during her glacial period, when Snowdon was still being slowly lifted towards the clouds, and every valley in Wales was brimful of ice. But the glaciers in English Bay are by no means the largest in the island. We ourselves got a view...
˹ 132 - ... back again ; then down the other side once more, with the same unresisting force ; and so on, up and down, and down and up, swashing to and fro for hours before it comes finally to rest. Picture this, and you will have an image of power not to be seen by the action of any other forces upon the earth. The disturbance of the water was inconceivably fine. Waves of enormous magnitude were rolled up with great violence against the glacier, covering it with spray ; and billows came tearing down the...
˹ 144 - ... or 500 feet high. Nothing is more dangerous than to approach these cliffs of ice. Every now and then huge masses detach themselves from the face of the crystal steep, and topple over into the water; and woe be to the unfortunate ship which might happen to be passing below. Scoresby himself actually witnessed a mass of ice, the size of a cathedral, thunder down into the sea from a height of 400 feet...

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