Mental and Moral Science: A Compendium of Psychology and Ethics

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1868 - 850 ˹
"The present treatise, contains a Systematic Exposition of Mind, a History of the leading Questions in Mental Philosophy, and a copious Dissertation on Ethics. The Exposition of Mind, occupying nearly half the work, is, for the most part, an abridgement of my two volumes on the subject. I have singled out, and put in conspicuous type, the leading positions; and have given a sufficient number of examples to make them understood. It is not to be expected that the full effect of the larger exposition can be produced in the shorter; still, there may be an occasional advantage in the more succinct presentation of complicated doctrines. As regards the Controverted Questions, I have entered fully into the history of opinion, so as to present the different views, both formerly, and at present, entertained on each. Nominalism and Realism, the Origin of Knowledge in the mind, External Perception, Beauty, and Freewill, are the chief subjects thus treated"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
 

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Quick movements their exciting character
9
The tendency of Ideas to become Actualities a source of activity
12
BOOK I
13
The Language of the Feelings has to be acquired
36
The Naturalist mind represents disinterested association
42
SENSE OF TOUCH
43
Proper duration of exercises
48
SENSE OF HEARING
51
Written language appeals to the sense of Visible Form
54
The Subject Sciences are grounded on selfconsciousness 120
60
The complex current of each ones existence
68
SENSATIONS OF THE SAME SENSE
93
CHAP VII
99
rary adhesiveness
125
Movements and Feelings of Movement identified
131
Effects common to the Senses generally
137
I Definition
143
Figures of Similitude abound in all great works of literary
149
MIXED CONTIGUITY AND SIMILARITY
155
CONSTRUCTIVE ASSOCIATION
161
Constructing new muscular ideas Hitting mark Archi
165
Construction of Sentences
168
PRACTICAL CONSTRUCTIONS
171
Abstraction means attending to points of agreement and neglect
179
OF EXTERNAL PERCEPTION
188
Objection to the theory of Acquired Perception that we are
194
Energy as opposed to Passive Feeling 5 II Uniform connexion of Definite Feelings with Definito
198
HUME Summary of his philosophical doctrines generally
205
the Intellect
215
Feeling in general defined ib 3 Twofold aspect of FeelingPhysical and Mental
216
CHARACTERS OF FEELING 6 The Characters of Feeling fall under four classes
217
Volitional characters of Feeling 9 The voluntary actions a clue to the Feelings
218
The Ideal persistence of feelings extends their sphere ib Mixed characters of Feeling 11 Will combined with Ideal persistence makes Forethought
219
The influence in Belief is a mixed character
220
THE INTERPRETATION AND ESTIMATE OF FEELING 15 1 The Expression indicates the feelings of others
221
2 The Conduct pursued indicates pleasure and pain ib 17 3 The Course of the Thoughts bears the impress of the Feelings
222
Some standard or common measure must be agreed upon
223
The criteria of feeling applied to estimate happiness and misery ib THE DEVELOPMENT OF FEELING 22 An outburst of feeling passes through a c...
224
Alternation and periodicity of emotional states ib 24 Ends to be served by the analysis of the Feelings
225
Detailed Classification
227
PHYSICAL side a loss and a transfer of nervous energy
234
The PHYSICAL side involves 1 Touch 2 the Lachrymal
240
Link of sequence physical and mental between the stimulants
241
The spectacle of Generosity stimulates Tenderness
247
Selfcomplacency and the Love of Admiration as motives
256
1 an effect sought to vent activity
262
Chance or Uncertainty contributes to the engrossment
269
The excitement of Pursuit is seen in the Lower Animals
270
Contests ib 8 The occupations of Industry give scope for Plotinterest
271
The search after Knowledge
272
Form of pain the prolongation of the suspense
273
Pleasures and pains attending Intellectual operations is Feelings in the working of Contiguity
274
Discoveries of Practice gives the pleasure of increased power ib 7 Illustrative Comparisons remit intellectual toil
276
SYMPATHY is entering into and acting out the feelings of others ih 2 It supposes 1 our remembered experience 2 a connexion between the Expressi...
277
Circumstances favouring Sympathy
278
Completion of Sympathyvicarious action
279
Sympathy with pleasure and pain
280
Sympathy supports mens feelings and opinions ib 8 Moulding of mens sentiments and views ib 9 Sympathy an indirect source of pleasure to the sym...
281
Sympathy cannot subsist upon extreme selfabnegation
282
IDEAL EMOTION 1 The persistence of Fealing makes the life in the Ideal
283
Ideal Emotion is affected by Organic states
284
Command of the Thoughts a means of controlling the Feelings
344
The Will biased by Fixed Ideas
351
RESOLUTION is postponed action
363
CHAP V
365
1 the wants of the system 2
369
Belief attaches to the pursuit of intermediate ends
375
Belief in the order of the World varies with the three elements
382
THE CONFLICT OF MOTIVES
386
Invigoration
391
The perplexity of the question is owing to the inaptness of
398
Meanings of Choice Deliberation Selfdetermination Moral
405
HOBBES Voluntary action follows the last Appetite Deliber
411
JONATHAN EDWARDS Vindicates Philosophical Necessity
417
ETHICS
429
The BONUM SUMMUM BONUM or Happiness PAGE
432
CHAP II
433
Morality in its essential parts is Eternal and Immutable
440
THE MORAL FACULTY
448
Emotions generally
453
PART II
460
PLATO Review of the Dialogues containing portions of Ethical
471
Book Second Definition and classification of the Moral virtues PAGE Book Second Definition and classification of the Moral virtues
481
Book Fourth Liberality Magnificence Magnanimity Mild
490
SENSATION
496
Book Seventh Gradations of moral strength and moral weakness
500
Grounds of Friendship
506
THE NEOPLATONISTS The Moral End to be attained through
535
CUDWORTH Moral Good and Evil cannot be arbitrary The mind
561
Nature Benevolence not ultimately at variance with SelfLove
573
affecting the moral good or evil of actions Rights and Laws
580
MANDEVILLE Virtue supported solely by self interest Compassion
593
PRICE The distinctions of Right and Wrong are perceived by
617
duct of Association
633
STEWART The Moral Faculty an original power Criticism
639
its
646
BENTHAM Utility the sole foundation of Morals Principles
659
MACKINTOSH Universality of Moral Distinctions Antithesis
677
AUSTIN Laws defined and classified The Divine Laws how
686
WHEWELL Opposing schemes of Morality Proposal to reconcile
697
BAILEY Facts of the human constitution that give origin to moral
714
KANT Distinguishes between the empirical and the rational mode
726
Cousix Analysis of the sentiments aroused in us by human
740
JOUFFROY Each creature has a special nature and a special
746
1 Muscular Feelings compared with Sensations The muscular
1
Mode of action in the first place an optical effect
3
A mode of Tender Feeling
4
Higher Combinations of language
5
Pain of Chillness Pleasure of transition to warmth
7
HOPE and DESPONDENCY are phases of Belief
10
ARISTOTLE Enters his protest against separating Universals from
13
Separate ideas become selfsustaining by repetition
19
THE STOICS Their alteration of the Categories 21
21
Movements with Sensations Muscular Ideas with Sensations
25
LOCKE General terms the signs of general ideas 27
27
Browx A general word designates certain particulars together
30
Law of the association
31
THE SCHOOLMEN Opposing views were held The question
45
CUDWORTH Sense and Cognition Ideas of Cognition
52
KANT His position as between the opposing schools Maintained
58
59
59
History the succession of events as narrated
65

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˹ 657 - Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.
˹ 700 - The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.
˹ 203 - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
˹ 548 - ... that a man be willing, when others are so too, as far forth, as for peace, and defence of himself he shall think it necessary, to lay down this right to all things; and be contented with so much liberty against other men, as he would allow other men against himself.
˹ 653 - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
˹ 657 - The principle of utility recognises this subjection, and assumes it for the foundation of that system, the object of which is to rear the fabric of felicity by the hands of reason and of law. Systems which attempt to question it, deal in sounds instead of sense, in caprice instead of reason, in darkness instead of light.
˹ 547 - The RIGHT OF NATURE, which writers commonly call jus naturale, is the liberty each man hath, to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life; and consequently, of doing anything which in his own judgment and reason he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto.
˹ 731 - ... the idea of the will of every rational being as a will giving universal law.
˹ 26 - Likewise the idea of man that I frame to myself must be either of a white, or a black, or a tawny, a straight, or a crooked, a tall, or a low, or a middle-sized man.
˹ 411 - In this then consists freedom, viz. in our being able to act or not to act, according as we shall choose or will.

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