Klio: Beiträge zur alten Geschichte, 14

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Dieterich'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1915
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˹ 450 - They desolated his people and his land like that which is not. They came with fire prepared before them, forward to Egypt. Their main support was Peleset, Thekel, Shekelesh, Denyen, and Weshesh. These lands were united, and they laid their hands upon the land as far as the circle of the earth. Their hearts were confident, full of their plans.
˹ 450 - Not one stood before their hands; from Kheta, Kode. Carchemish, Arvad, Alasa they were wasted. They set up a camp in one place in Amor. They desolated his people and his land like that which is not. They came with fire prepared before them, forward to Egypt. Their main support was Peleset, Thekel, Shekelesh, Denyen and Weshesh.
˹ 176 - Ule meo officio | adsiduo florebat ad omnis l 498 adulescens, tarn etsi properas, | hic te saxsolus rogat ut se | aspicias, deinde ut quod scriptust | legas, hic sunt ossa Maeci Lucí sita | Pilotimi uasculari.
˹ 77 - ... southern is not very large, and is almost dry at the conclusion of the great heats ; but the northern, which generally covers considerably more than a square mile, offers several parts which are at all seasons impassable. Both, however, leave a broad, firm, sandy beach between them and the sea. The uninterrupted flatness of the plain is hardly relieved by a single tree ; and an amphitheatre of rocky hills and rugged mountains separates it from the rest of Attica, over the lower ridges of which...
˹ 95 - Gewicht, bis zu dem die einzelnen Wägungen lückenlos fortschreiten und das seinerseits noch durch mehrere Exemplare belegt ist.
˹ 496 - Reallexikon des klassischen Altertums. Achte vollständig umgearbeitete Auflage herausgegeben von J. Geffcken und E. Ziebarth in Verbindung mit BA Müller, unter Mitwirkung von W. Liebenam, E. Pernice, M. Wellmann, E. Hoppe ua Mit 8 Plänen im Text.
˹ 86 - ... related at Susa or at Athens. We may reasonably suspect that the history of the war by Dionysius had a value for Ionian self-love; that it may have done less than justice to the victorious Greeks; but that it probably did more justice to Persia than the enemy would have received from an Athenian writer. This Ionian logos of the Persian war was, we may conjecture, a challenge to unreserved admirers of Athens; we shall see in the next lecture how such a challenge was taken up.

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