Introduction to Ethics

˹
Scribner, 1900 - 346 ˹
 

Դ繨ҡ - ¹Ԩó

辺Ԩó 觢ŷ

John Stuart Mill
169
Sidgwick and Contemporaries
173
General Survey
176
190
190
CHAPTER VIII
205
Pleasure as the Highest Good
207
The Antecedents of Action
209
The Antecedents of Volition
215
Conclusions 6 The Hedonistic Psychology of Action
217
Present or Apprehended Pleasurepain as the Motive 8 Present Pleasurepain as the Motive 9 Pain as the Motive
218
Unconscious Pleasurepain as the Motive
234
The Psychological Fallacies of Hedonism
236
The Pleasure of the Race as the Motive 13 Pleasure as the End realized by All Action
239
Pleasurepain as a Means of Preservation
242
The Physiological Basis of Pleasurepain
246
Metaphysical Hedonism
247
Pleasure as the Moral
249
The Question of Ends or Ideals
250
The Ideal of Humanity
253
205
257
3 Hume
258
The Motives of Action
261
Criticism of Egoism
263
Selfishness and Sympathy
267
Moral Motive and Moral Action
269
Biology and the Highest Good
276
Morality and the Highest Good
278
Conclusion
284
OPTIMISM VERSUS PESSIMISM O 1 Optimism and Pessimism
286
Subjective Pessimism
287
Scientific Pessimism
289
Intellectual Pessimism
290
Emotional Pessimism 6 Volitional Pessimism 286 287 289
291
CHAPTER XI
311
Character
317
The Freedom of the Will 4 Determinism
319
Theological Theories
323
Metaphysical Theories
324
Reconciliation of Freedom and Determinism
327
Criticism of Indeterminism
329
The Consciousness of Freedom
334
Responsibility
336
Determinism and Practice
337
4 Rousseau Kant A Smith Herbart Brentano 26 27 28 29
341
36
342
39
343
Conscience as the Standard 2 The Theological View 116 117
344
176
345
ԢԷ

Ѻ - ٷ

շ辺

˹ 122 - But if thy brother be grieved with thy meat, now walkest thou not charitably. Destroy not him with thy meat for whom Christ died."* " Let us therefore follow after the things which make for peace, and things wherewith one may edify another.
˹ 291 - The days of our age are threescore years and ten ; and though men be so strong that they come to fourscore years, yet is their strength then but labour and sorrow ; so soon passeth it away, and we are gone.
˹ 50 - Knowledge then seems to me to be nothing but the perception of the connection and agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy, of any of our ideas.
˹ 299 - Past, But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast And the days are dark and dreary. Be still, sad heart ! and cease repining ; Behind the clouds is the sun still shining ; Thy fate is the common fate of all, Into each life some rain must fall, Some days must be dark and dreary.
˹ 170 - Few human creatures would consent to be changed into any of the lower animals for a promise of the fullest allowance of a beast's pleasures; no intelligent human being would consent to be a fool, no instructed person would be an ignoramus, no person of feeling and conscience would be selfish and base, even though they should be persuaded that the fool, the dunce, or the rascal is better satisfied with his lot than they are with theirs.
˹ 170 - It is better to be a human being dissatisfied than a pig satisfied; better to be Socrates dissatisfied than a fool satisfied.
˹ 142 - NOTHING can possibly be conceived in the world, or even out of it, which can be called good without qualification, except a Good Will.
˹ 303 - Tired with all these, for restful death I cry As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity...
˹ 295 - And though it sometimes seem of its own might Like to an eye of gold to be fix'd there, And firm to hover in that empty height, That only is because it is so light But in that pomp it doth not long appear ; For when 'tis most admired, in a thought, Because it erst was nought, it turns to nought.
˹ 97 - And he said, I heard thy voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself.

óҹء