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Thee shall each ale-house, thee each gill-house

mourn, And answering gin-shops sourer sighs return. .

" Jacob, the scourge of grammar, mark with awe, Nor less revere him, blunderbuss of law. 150

REMARKS.

Ver. 145. From the strong fate of drams if thou get free,

Another Durfey, Ward ! shall shine in thee;] Не.

appears to have consulted Dryden's translation of the verses parodied with so much humour :

“ Ah! could'st thou break through fate's severe decree,
A new Marcellus shall arise in thee."

Wakefield. Ver. 149. Jacob, the scourge of grammar, mark with awe,] “ This gentleman is son of a considerable maltster of Romsey in Southamptonshire, and bred to the law under a very eminent attorney: who, between his more laborious studies, has diverted himself with poetry. He is a great admirer of poets and their works, which has occasioned him to try his genius that way.—He has writ in prose the Lives of the Poets, Essays, and a great many law-books, The Accomplish'd Conveyancer, Modern Justice, 80.

GILES

IMITATIONS.

Ver. 145. From the strong fute of drams if thou get free,]

si quâ fata aspera rumpas, Tu Marcellus eris !" Virg. Æneid. vi. P. Ver. 147. Thee shall each ale-house, &c.]

“ Te nemus Anguitiæ, vitreâ te Fucinus undà,

Te liquidi flevere lacus." Virg. Æneid. vii. Virgil again, Ecl. x.

illum etiam lauri, etiam flevēre myricæ," &c. P. Ver. 150.]

“ duo fulmina belli Scipiadas, cladem Libyæ!"

Virg. Æneid. vi. P.

VARIATIONS.

Ver. 149.] In the first Edit. it was,

Woolston, the scourge of scripture, mark with awe!
And mighty Jacob, blunderbuss of law!

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Lo! Popple's brow, tremendous to the town, Horneck’s fierce eye, and Roome's funereal frown.

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Giles Jacob of himself, Lives of Pocis, vol. i. He very grossly, and unprovoked, abused in that book, the author's friend, Mr. Gay.

P. Ver. 149, 150. Jacob, the scourge of grammar, mark with awe,

Nor less redere him, blunderbuss of law.] There may seem some error in these verses, Mr. Jacob having proved our author to have a respect for him by this undeniable argument. “ He had once a regard for my judgment ; otherwise he would never have subscribed Two Guineas to me for one small book in octavo.” Jacob's Letter to Dennis, printed in Dennis's Remarks on the Dunciad, p. 49. Therefore I should think the appellation of blunderbuss to Mr. Jacob, like that of thunderbolt to Scipio, was meant in his honour.

Mr. Dennis argues the same way. “My writings having made great impression on the minds of all sensible men. Mr. P. repented, and, to give proof of his repentance, subscribed to my two volumes of select works, and afterwards to my two volumes of Letters.”— Ibid. p. 80. We should hence believe, the name of Mr. Dennis hath also crept into this poem by some mistake. But from hence, gentle reader ! thou may'st beware, when thou givest thy money to such authors, not to flatter thyself that thy motives are goodnature or charity.

P.+ Ver. 151. Lo! Popple's brow,] Popple was the author of some vile plays and pamphlets. He published abuses on our author in a paper called The Prompler.

P.T Ver. 152. Horneck and Roome] These two were virulent partywriters, worthily coupled together, and one would think prophetically, since after the publishing of this piece, the former dying, the latter succeeded him in honour and employment. The first was Philip Horneck, author of a Billingsgate Paper, called The

High

VARIATIONS.

Ver. 151. Lo! Popple's brow, &c.] In the former Edd.

Haywood, Centlivre, glories of their race !
Lo! Horneck's fierce, and Roome's peculiar face.

W.+

Lo! sneering Goode, half malice and half whim,
A fiend in glee, ridiculously grim.
Each cygnet sweet, of Bath and Tunbridge race, 155
Whose tuneful whistling makes the waters pass,
Each songster, riddler, ev'ry nameless name,
All crowd, who foremost shall be damn'd to fame.

REMARKS. High German Doctor. Edward Roome was son of an undertaker for funerals in Fleet-street, and wrote some of the papers

called Pasquin, where by malicious inuendos he endeavoured to represent our author guilty of malevolent practices with a great man then under the prosecution of Parliament. On this man was made the following Epigram:

“ You ask why Roome diverts yon with his jokes,
Yet, if he writes, is dull as other folks ;
You wonder at it.—This, Sir, is the case ;
The jest is lost unless he prints his face.”

P. Is it surprising, shall I say, or mortifying, to see the pains and patience of our author and his friends who compiled these large notes, in tracing out the lives and works of such paltry and forgotten scribblers! It is like walking through the darkest alleys of the dirtiest part of St. Giles's. To pull out these literary Cacuses, incendia vana vomentes, from their dark dungeons and deep retreats, was a truly Herculean (though not very heroic) labour. These, in truth, were Avia Pieridum loca!

Warton. Ver. 153. Goode,] An ill-natur'd critic, who wrote a satire on our author, called The mock Esop, and many anonymous libels in newspapers for hire.

P. Ver. 155. Each cygnet sweet,] Borrowed from two lines of Young's Universal Passion, S. 6.

“Is there a wit who chants the reigning lass,

And sweetly whistles as the waters pass!" Warion. Ver. 156. Whose tuneful whistling] There were several successions of these sort of minor poets, at Tunbridge, Bath, &c. singing the praise of the Annuals flourishing for that season; whose names indeed would be nameless, and therefore the poet slurs them over with others, in general.

P. Ver. 157. cd'ry nameless name,] Personal satire, on objects so

obscure

Some strain in rhyme; the Muses, on their racks,
Scream like the winding of ten thousand jacks:
Some, free from rhyme or reason, rule or check,
Break Priscian's head, and Pegasus's neck:
Down, down they larum, with impetuous whirl,
The Pindars, and the Miltons of a Curl.
“Silence, ye wolves! while Ralph to Cynthia
howls,

165 And makes Night hideous ! Answer him, ye owls ! !

REMARKS.

obscure, is unavoidably attended with the inconvenience of accompanying it with large notes and explanations, which, though tedious, are necessary; and without which it would be unintelligible. Brossette has been forced to use this method in his many notes on the Lutrin, and on the Satires of Boileau.

Warton. Ver. 165. Silence, ye wolves! while Ralph to Cynthia howls,] A. Phillips, in his Letters from Copenhagen :

“The starving wolves along the main sea prowl,

And to the moon in icy valleys howl.Wakefield. Ver. 165. Ralph] James Ralph, a name inserted after the first editions, not known to our author till he writ a swearingpiece called Sawney, very abusive of Dr. Swift, Mr. Gay, and

himself

IMITATIONS.

Ver. 166. And makes Night hideous)

Visit thus the glimpses of the moon,
Making Night hideous.". SHAKESP.

P.

VARIATIONS.
Ver. 157. Each songster, riddler, &c.] In the former Edd.

Lo! Bond and Foxton, ev'ry nameless name.
Two inoffensive offenders against our poet; persons unknown,
but by being mentioned by Curl.
After ver. 158, in the first Edit. followed,

How proud, how pale, how earnest all appear !
How rhymes eternal jingle in their ear!

w.t

P.

Lo! sneering Goode, half malice and half whim,
A fiend in glee, ridiculously grim.
Each cygnet sweet, of Bath and Tunbridge race, 155
Whose tuneful whistling makes the waters pass,
Each songster, riddler, ev'ry nameless name,
All crowd, who foremost shall be damn'd to fame.

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REMARKS.

High German Doctor. Edward Roome was son of an undertaker for funerals in Fleet-street, and wrote some of the papers called Pasquin, where by malicious inuendos he endeavoured to represent our author guilty of malevolent practices with a great man then under the prosecution of Parliament. On this man was made the following Epigram:

“ You ask why Roome diverts yon with his jokes,

Yet, if he writes, is dull as other folks ;
You wonder at it.—This, Sir, is the case ;
The jest is lost unless he prints his face.”

P.
Is it surprising, shall I say, or mortifying, to see the pains and
patience of our author and his friends who compiled these large
notes, in tracing out the lives and works of such paltry and for-
gotten scribblers! It is like walking through the darkest alleys of
the dirtiest part of St. Giles's. To pull out these literary Cacuses,
incendia vana vomentes, from their dark dungeons and deep re-
treats, was a truly Herculean (though not very heroic) labour.
These, in truth, were Avia Pieridum loca!

· Warton. Ver. 153. Goode,] An ill-natur'd critic, who wrote a satire on our author, called The mock Esop, and many anonymous libels in newspapers for hire.

P. Ver. 155. Each cygnet sweet,] Borrowed from two lines of Young's Universal Passion, S. 6.

“Is there a wit who chants the reigning lass,

And sweetly whistles as the waters pass !" Warlon. Ver. 156. Whose luneful whistling] There were several successions of these sort of minor poets, at Tunbridge, Bath, &c. singing the praise of the Annuals flourishing for that season ; whose names indeed would be nameless, and therefore the poet slurs them over with others, in general.

Pot Ver. 157. ev'ry nameless name,] Personal satire, on objects so

obscure

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