The Works of Robert Browning, 2

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Houghton Mifflin, 1899
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˹ 46 - Hark! where my blossomed pear-tree in the hedge Leans to the field and scatters on the clover Blossoms and dewdrops at the bent spray's edge That's the wise thrush; he sings each song twice over, Lest you should think he never could recapture The first fine careless rapture!
˹ 231 - Then off there flung in smiling joy, And held himself erect By just his horse's mane, a boy: You hardly could suspect (So tight he kept his lips compressed, Scarce any blood came through) You looked twice ere you saw his breast Was all but shot in two.
˹ 24 - Sixteen years old when she died ! Perhaps she had scarcely heard my name ; It was not her time to love ; beside, Her life had many a hope and aim, Duties enough and little...
˹ 4 - Never glad confident morning again! Best fight on well, for we taught him strike gallantly, Menace our heart ere we master his own; Then let him receive the new knowledge and wait us, Pardoned in heaven, the first by the throne! "HOW THEY BROUGHT THE GOOD NEWS FROM GHENT TO AIX.
˹ 4 - We shall march prospering, not thro' his presence; Songs may inspirit us, not from his lyre; Deeds will be done, while he boasts his quiescence, Still bidding crouch whom the rest bade aspire...
˹ 25 - I loved you, Evelyn, all the while ! My heart seemed full as it could hold ; There was place and to spare for the frank young' smile, And the red young mouth, and the hair's young gold. So, hush, I will give you this leaf to keep : See, I shut it inside the sweet cold hand ! There, that is our secret : go to sleep ! You will wake, and remember, and understand.
˹ 285 - You should have heard the Hamelin people Ringing the bells till they rocked the steeple. " Go," cried the Mayor, " and get long poles, Poke out the nests and block up the holes ! Consult with carpenters and builders, And leave in our town not even a trace Of the rats! " when suddenly, up the face Of the Piper perked in the market-place, W>th a, " First, if you please, my thousand guilders !
˹ 4 - Not a word to each other; we kept the great pace Neck by neck, stride by stride, never changing our place; I turned in my saddle and made its girths tight, Then shortened each stirrup, and set the pique right, Rebuckled the cheek-strap, chained slacker the bit, Nor galloped less steadily Roland a whit.
˹ 279 - tis so, Since now at length my fate I know, Since nothing all my love avails, Since all, my life seemed meant for, fails, Since this was written and needs must be My whole heart rises up to bless Your name in pride and thankfulness...
˹ 6 - ... stirrup, leaned, patted his ear, Called my Roland his pet-name, my horse without peer ; Clapped my hands, laughed and sang, any noise, bad or good, Till at length into Aix Roland galloped and stood. And all I remember is, friends flocking round As I sat with his head 'twixt my knees on the ground ; And no voice but was praising this Roland of mine, As I poured down his throat our last measure of wine, Which (the burgesses voted by common consent) Was no more than his due who brought good news...

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