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credit for such work toward an advanced degree, and there have been cases in which the master's degree has been conferred for work done entirely in successive sessions of the summer school.

Another class of cases consisted of graduate students who were able to undertake certain work to better advantage during the summer than at any other time of the year. Work of this nature, such as hydraulics, entomology, agriculture, etc., has often been pursued during the entire summer and credit toward graduation for a period of three months has frequently been allowed.

While it is a question whether graduate work for so brief a period as the session of the summer school should be allowed, no serious difficulties are presented where graduate students desire credit for work done in the summer school under the instruction of professors in that school. The principal difficulty arises in other cases where students are doing work not in the summer school but under the supervison of individual professors who happen to be in Ithaca during the summer. Professors under these circumstances find themselves called upon to supervise graduate work and receive from the University no compensation for this addition to their labors, and heretofore graduate students pursuing work at this time have not been considered as in attendance in the University to the extent of paying tuition. This latter difficulty has been removed by a recent action of the Trustees of the University requiring payment of tuition for at least one year before the master's degree is conferred, and payment for at least three years before the doctor's degree is conferred, unless one or more years have been spent in graduate study at some other university.

An increasing number of graduates of this and other universities, generally teachers, are anxious to receive an advanced degree, but are unable to be in residence at Ithaca during the regular sessions of the University. It is of great advantage to such students to be allowed to pursue their studies in Ithaca during the summer vacation and receive credit for three months' residence towards an advanced degree. It is, however, extremely questionable whether the University is wise in permitting this. It is almost impossible that studies pursued under these circumstances should be supervised in the same way in which they are during the regular sessions of the University. A strong argument can be made in favor of the practice in certain scientific subjects, such as hydraulics, entomology, botany, agriculture, and the like, but there is danger of extending this privilege to students pursuing general literary courses involving little but reading and consultation of the library without the strict discipline of recitations, lectures, and seminary work. The whole matter should be taken up by the University Faculty and the policy of the University should be definitely settled.

The form of thesis for the doctorate was somewhat changed by action of the Faculty requiring that in addition to the present rule, "In the title page of each of these copies shall appear the statement that the thesis was presented to the University Faculty of Cornell University for the degree in question,” “The name of the author must be given in full and if the thesis is a reprint, the place and date of original publication must also be given." The Faculty also voted that the copy of the thesis for advan -ed degrees deposited in the University library must be bound.

For some time no thesis has been required for the master's degree in Architecture, a drawing or a similar piece of work being submitted in place of the thesis, and the requirement for this degree was modified in accordance with the practice by omitting from the regalations the words "presenting a satisfactory thesis.”

5. SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS.

The Committee on Scholarships reconimended certain changes in the statute governing the award of the Frank William Padgham Scholarship which were accepted by the University Faculty and approved by the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees. The scholarship in question was originally intended to entitle the holder to free tuition and fees in the regular course in the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering and to be awarded to the best competing candidate in an examination in the studies required for entrance to the regular course of Mechanical Engineering, who shall have had his preparatory education in the public schools of Syracuse, N. Y. Through some misunderstanding this scholarship was for some years awarded in connection with a New York State Scholarship, and the examination by which it was awarded was the regular undergraduate scholarship examination. In order to meet more fully the wishes of the founder of the scholarship a new statute was drawn up and approved as follows:

“I. The Frank William Padgham Scholarship was founded in 1892 by Amos Padgham of Syracuse, N. Y., in memory of his son, Frank William Padgham, a graduate of Sibley College of the class. of 1888.

II. The scholarship entitles the holder to free tuition and fees in the regular course in the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering. It cannot consequently be held in connection with a New York State Scholarship.

III. The scholarship will be awarded to the candidate, who, having been admitted to the regular course in the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering, shall pass the best examination in a competitive examination of studies required for admission to the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering.

IV. The candidate must have had his preparatory education wholly or in part in the public schools of Syracuse, N. Y.

V. The subjects for the competitive examination shall be the following subjects from those required for admission to the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering: 1. Advanced Mathematics, 2. Advanced German, 3. Advanced French, 4. Physics, 5. Chemistry. Of these five subjects the candidate must take three, including Advanced Mathematics, and one modern language.

VI. The examination for the Padgham Scholarship shall be held at the same time as the University Undergraduate Scholarship examinations, but shall be a special examination, and the candidate must declare his intention to enter the Padgham Scholarship examination and state his qualifications therefor, to the Registrar who will issue the usual permit to enter the Scholarship examination.

VII. Should there be no candidate for the Frank William Padgham Scholarship entering the Sibley College of Mechanical Engineering at any time when the scholarship is vacant, any student who has previously entered that college from Syracuse, and who shall haye had his preparatory education in whole or in part in the public schools of Syracuse, shall on application to, and in the discretion of, the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, be eligible to the scholarship in such manner and on such records of scholarship as may seenr best to said Faculty.

VIII. Should there be no candidate under Sec. VII who has received his education in whole or in part in the public schools of Syracuse, N. Y., the competition shall be open to any student from the State of New York approved by the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, as eligible, and appointment shall be made in accordance with Sec. VII.

IX. The holder of this scholarship if he has received his preparatory education wholly or in part in the public schools of Syracuse, N. Y., shall retain the scholarship (subject to the customary restrictions and requirements of the University Faculty as respects conduct and good scholarship) throughout the whole period of his regular course, should he so desire. A substitute appointed to this scholarship under Section VII, or VIII, shall not hold it for more than one year. Should the vacancy take place after the beginning of any year it may be filled under the above provisions at the beginning of the next succeeding term and for the remainder of the year.

X. In other respects than those above prescribed the regulations affecting scholarships generally as now and hereafter framed by the Faculty of Cornell University shall apply to this Scholarship.

XI. The Superintendent of Public Schools of Syracuse and the Principal of the Syracuse High School shall be notified of any vacancy, actual, not technical, by the Registrar, who shall also notify them of the name of the beneficiary after the scholarship has been awarded and whether the scholarship has been awarded on entrance examination or for one year as provided by Sections VII and VIII.”

Some minor changes were also made in the statute governing the award of the regular University Undergraduate Scholarships. Heretofore candidates have been required to pass an examination in English, either in the regular entrance examination in English at the University or the entrance examination in English given by the College Entrance Examination Board or by offering satisfactory Regents' credentials covering certain subjects, and other diplomas and school certificates were not accepted in place of this English examination. There seemed no longer any necessity for treating the subject of English in a different way from other entrance subjects and the requirement in regard to English in the statute was abolished. The requirement in the statute that recipients of these scholarships must be free from entrance conditions is sufficient to maintain the high standard of excellence in the candidates.

Owing to the creation of a separate department of Physical Geography, this department was added to the group of Botany and Geology entitled to a Fellowship and Scholarship.

Graduate students who are not candidates for a degree, as well as those who are, have been required to work under the direction of a special committee of the Faculty. The numbers of such students for the past fifteen years has been as follows:

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6 10

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91 '92 93 94 95 96 '97 '98 99 'oo 'ol 'o2 '03 '04 '05 '06 Tot. A.M. --- 6 6 4 8 2 I 10 10 16 14 20 19 22 12 23 13

186 Ph. M.

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9 M.L.

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2
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9 M.S. 7 7

7 12 M.C.E. - 2 2 8 4 I 3 2 I 3 3 3

I 33 M.M E., 3 6 14 16 8 15 6 2 7 4 Io 4 7 6 9 4 121 Ph.D. 3 8 4 16 13 14

7 19 20 23 20 13 21 19

134 D.Sc. 2 3 6 3 3

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2 IO II 33 M.S. in Arch.

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64

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Total - 21 30 35 66 44 48 37 44 35 38 54 53 56 34 67 49

711

The candidates for advanced degrees during 1895-1906 were distributed as follows:

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Total.. 173 131 133 145 155 154 183 170 182 175 182 212

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