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N. D. Becker, Eloction and Oratory, promoted from an assistant

ship, May 26, 1906. F. R. Sharpe and W. B. Carver, Instructors in Mathematics, the

former promoted from an assistantship, May 26, 1906. G. R. White and G. C. Robertson, Instructors in Chemistry, pro

moted from assistantships, May 26, 1906. H. Leighton, Instructor in Geology, promoted from assistantship,

May 26, 1906. C. W. Wright, Instructor in Economics, May 29, 1906. R. North, Instructor in Architecture, May 29, 1906. G. R. Chamberlain, Instructor in Freehand Drawing, May 29, 1906. S. S. Garrett and A. J. Edge, Instructors in Civil Engineering, May

29, 1906. J. H. Hathaway, Instructor in (Medical) Anatomy, May 29, 1906. W. J. Taylor, Instructor in (Veterinary) Bacteriology, May 29, 1906. F. Leighton, P. I. Wold, L. C. Roberts and R. C. Gibbs, Instructors

in Physics, promoted from assistantships, June 5, 1906. F. K. Richtmyer, Instructor in Physics, June 5, 1906. C. C. Myers, W. E. Hogan, and M. L. Lovell, Instructors in Machine

Design, June 5, 1906. G. C. Estill and J. R. Cautley, Instructors in Descriptive Geometry

in Sibley College, June 5, 1906. F. A. Burr, Instructor in Experimental Engineering, June 5, 1906. G. P. Watkins, Instructor in Statistics, promoted from an assistant

ship, June 12, 1906. A. Ranum, Instructor in Mathematics, June 12, 1906. B. B. Charles, Assistant in Semitic Languages and Literatures,

April 17, 1906. B. R. Hoobler, Assistant in Clinical Pathology, May 15, 1906. F. B. Humphries, Assistant in Histology, May 15, 1906. 0. Teague, Assistant in Experimental Pathology, May 15, 1906. S. Broun, Clinical Assistant in Neurology, May 15, 1906. B. S. Barringer, J. S. Read, and V. J. Thorne, Clinical Assistants in

Genito-Urinary Diseases, May 15, 1906. G. H. Sabine, Assistant in Philosophy, May 26, 1906. W. A. Frayer, Assistant in Mediæval History, May 26, 1906. J. F. Craig, Assistant in Mathematics, May 26, 1906. A. H. Olive, G. A. Rankin, F. F. Shetterly, H. W. Gillett, and S.

M. Herrick, Assistants in Chemistry, May 26, 1906. N. Coil, Assistant in Botany, May 26, 1906.

J. M. Swaine and W. P. Fraser, Assistants in Neurology and Verte

brate Zoology, May 26, 1906. E. E. Brandow, Assistant in Physical Culture, May 26, 1906. G. D. Bills, jr., W. B. Rapley, A. V. Franklin, M. W. Fisk, and A.

B. Cudebac, Assistants in Military Science and Tactics, May 26,

1906. A. A. Giesecke, Assistant in Politics, May 29, 1906. R. R. Kern and J. C. Kennedy, Assistants in Political Economy and

Finance, May 29, 1906. H. Walch, Assistant in Histology and Embryology, May 29, 1906. F. A. Molby, G, W. Nasmyth, A. A. Somerville, W. M. Stempel,

and 0. Tugman, Assistants in Physics, June 5, 1906. C. H. VanAuken, Assistant in Animal Husbandry, June 5, 1906. H. E. Ross, Laboratory Assistant in Dairying, June 5, 1906. J. M. Swaine, Assistant in Entomology, June 5, 1906. C. R. Crosby, Experimental Entomologist, June 5, 1906. L. S. Backus, Assistant in (Veterinary) Physiology, Pharmacology,

and Medicine, June 30, 1906. W. M. Wilson. Lecturer in Meteorology, June 30, 1906. J. E. Coit, Assistant in Horticulture, June 30, 1906. M. E. Cook, Assistant in Nature Study, June 30, 1906. A. H. Winder and W. J. Doetsch, Assistant Law Librarians, June 30,

1906. E. G. Bryan, Librarian and Stenographer in the college of Archi

tecture, June 30, 1906. F. E. Mix, Secretary to the Director of Sibley College, June 5, 1906. G. G. Bogert, President's Secretary and University Publisher, June

30, 1906.

APPENDIX II.

REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY

To the President of the University :

SIR :-I have the honor to submit my fourth annual report as Dean of the University Faculty. The subject matter is arranged with reference to the work of the Committees of which the Dean is ex-officio chairman and with reference to such functions as have been especially assigned to him by the Faculty.

During the past year the University has been invited to participate in the ceremonies connected with the installation of President James in the University of Illinois, and delegates were appointed by the President to represent Cornell University. Invitations were also received from the University of Melbourne, Australia, to send a delegate to participate in the ceremonies of the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of its foundation, and an alumnus of the University of Sydney, who is also an alumnus of Cornell, was appointed to represent Cornell University. Similar invitations were received from the University of Alabama for the celebration of the seventyfifth anniversary of its inauguration and from the University of Aberdeen on the occasion of the four hundredth anniversary of its foundation. Addresses were prepared and forwarded to these universities and a delegate was appointed to represent Cornell University at Aberdeen.

The University was called upon to mourn the death of Professor John L. Morris, a member of the Faculty of Cornell University for thirty-seven years, of which thirty-five were speut in active service. Resolutions of respect and condolence were spread upon the minutes of the Faculty and communicated to the family.

The establishment and endowment of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching was commemorated by the University Faculty in the following communication addressed to Mr. Andrew Carnegie :

To Andrew Carnegie

GREETING AND Good WILL:

In recognition of the noble purpose that found expression in the establishment and endowment of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, we, members of the Faculty of Cornell University, desire to make known to you the grateful appreciation in which we hold this unique provision for promoting the usefullness and dignity of the vocation of the teacher. To many of us it brings relief from anxiety, and to all an added sense of security; but we welcome it as well for the permanent and beneficent influence it will exert upon scholarship and teaching throughout America. May the consciousness of a service so beautiful and so enduring lend an added serenity to the many years which from our hearts we wish you. Cornell University, May, 1906.

This memorial, engrossed, illuminated and properly bound was sent to Mr. Carnegie.

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During the year 1905-1906 the number of schools from which students were received by certificate was 175, and the number of students presenting certificates was 376. The number of schools whose students had 110 mark below a pass was 82, and the number of students admitted with no mark below a pass was 235. Of the 93 schools with marks below a pass 53 had only one mark per school below a pass, and 40 had more than one mark per school below a pass. An investigation of the 40 schools having more than one mark per school below a pass resulted in withdrawing the certificate privilege from one school and warning fifteen.

At the request of the Committee the Registrar made a comparison of the standing of students admitted from private schools with that of students admitted from public schools with the following results:

The number of private schools is 309, or 36%.
The number of public schools is 553 or 64%.

The number of students coming from private schools during the last twenty years is 1865 or 42%.

The number of students from public schools during that time is 2520 or 58%.

The number of students from the private schools who were warned at the end of the first term is 132 or 7%.

The number of students from public schools who were warned at the end of the first term is 115 or. 5%.

The number of students from private schools who were warned after the first term was 284 or 15%.

The number of students from public schools who were warned after the first term was 233 or 9%.

The number of students from private schools who were dropped at the end of the first term was 138 or 7%.

The number of students from public schools who were dropped at the end of the first term was 77 or 3%

The number of students from private schools who were dropped after the first term was 153 or 8%.

The number of students from public schools who were dropped after the first term was ini or 5%.

After a careful examination of the subject the committee decided to recommend to the University Faculty that the certificate privilege now extended to private schools be discontinued after September, 1908, and that no private school be granted the certificate privilege after the present date. This resolution was referred by the Faculty to the Committee on University Policy to consider and report. The Committee on Admission by Certificate in making their suggestion for the discontiuuance of the certificate privilege extended to private schools were actuated partly by the facts shown in the above statistics, and partly from the difficulty of administering the certificate system in regard to private schools. The University has no means of supervising private schools and the only way of judging of their standard of scholarship is by the performance of the students sent by them to the University. This is a criterion not always fair to the school, and students may be well prepared when they enter the University and fail to maintain a satisfactory grade of scholarship after admission.

The case of public schools is quite different. There is state supervision of such schools and the University stands in peculiar relations to the public schools of the State of New York.

It is likely that some inconvenience would be caused by the discontinuance of the certificate privilege of private schools but this

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