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varied as usual. Formal dances and teas have been given by the four sororities, by several societies, by the women of the Medical School and of the College of Agriculture, by the Graduate Club, the Pennsylvania Club, the Spanish Club, and other combinations of students. The girls have diverted one another by parties of their own on Hallowe'en, Thanksgiving day and Washington's birthday, by the “ Anti-Junior ball” in Junior week, and by other informal class and private functions. The annual class “stunts” grow, as such affairs are growing everywhere, more elaborate and spectacular. The wo men of Sage have once entertained the women outside the dormi. tories. The assistant to the Warden and the other residents of the Cottage have given three teas. The Dramatic Club has offered three performances, the last and most ambitious being a reproduction of “ The Rivals”. The annual reception to the Faculty was modified this year to a series of three afternoon teas held in Decem. ber to each of which one third of the list of Trustees and Faculty was invited. In a further effort to reduce the crowding that has been an unpleasant feature of the receptions, only the upper class women and graduates were asked to help receive the guests, instead of the whole mass of students at Sage. Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead, Miss Ruth Putnam, and Miss Mabel Carter Rhodes of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae have at different times met and addressed the students. The Warden has entertained the senior class and representatives of the outside women, has held informal readings Sunday evenings during the winter term, and has been at home to all students on Thursday evenings during the year.

Respectfully submitted,

LOUISE ROPES LOOMIS,

Warden of Sage College

APPENDIX XIV

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR

To the President of the University :

SIR:-I have the honor to submit herewith my eleventh annual report as Registrar of the University. The report covers the academic year 1906-1907, including the Summer Session of 1907.

THE YEAR

1ο

Days in Sun- Holi. Vaca

To.

Session days days tion tal First term, Sept. 25-Jan. 30.

96 16

3

115 First term, Vacation, Jan. 31-Feb. I--

2

2 Christmas vacation, Dec 21-Jan 2.

13 13 Second term, Feb. 2-June 20..

109 18 2

129 Easter vacation, Mar. 23-April 1.

IO Summer vacation, June 21-July 3.

13 13 Summer Session, July 4-Aug. 14

6

42 Summer vacation, Aug. 15-Sept. 24--

41 41 In addition to the 241 days in session given above, the University Library was open every day in the year except holidays and there was no time during the year when college activities entirely ceased. The shops and some of the laboratories were also open during nearly all the vacation period.

36

STUDENTS

The following table, which shows the attendance for 1906–1907, gives the number who have received instruction this year, including those in the 1907 Summer Session and in the winter courses in agriculture, but excluding duplicates, as 4,225, an increase over last year's attendance of 103.

LAW

LL.B.
M

MEDICINE

M.D. м W T

AGRICULTURB B.S. in Agr. M W T

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CLASSIFICATION

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M W T
Graduates

196 43 239
Freshmen

142 89 231
Sophomores

110 83 193 Juniors

86 71 157
Seniors

53 149
Ist Year Class
and Year Class
3rd Year Class
Specials

9 9 18
Totals

196 43 239

443 305

748
Duplicates

IO I IT
Net Totals

186
42
228

443 305 748
Short Winter Agr.
Summer
Totals

186 42 228

443 305

748 Duplicates Net Totals

186 228 443 305

748

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The accompanying table shows the attendance in each course since the opening of the University in 1868. The only degree conferred in the College of Arts and Sciences is Bachelor of Arts. The former courses in Arts, Philosophy, Science, and Letters are now all under the jurisdiction of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and the total is given in the last ten columus. Previous to 1897 optional and special students were separately tabulated but now these are distributed as far as possible among the groups to which they belong.

The attendance for the year is the largest in the history of the University and the increase in the number of regular students this year is 62. Special attention is called to the fact that the above table includes winter and summer course students only as separately tabulated.

MATRICULATES

20

The following table shows that 1,483 students have registered during the present year for the first time. The table also shows the method of admission. Graduates

55 New York City Exam's Advanced standing

Coll. Ent. Board Ex..

37 Regents' credentials. 185 Medical (Ithaca)

32 School certificates. 324 Medical (N. Y. City)

69 By examination... 18 Veterinary students.-

30 As special students.

119

Summer Session (1907) - 374

220

Total

1,483 The small number entering by some of the above methods is due to the fact that two or more methods have been combined in a single case, the student, however, being listed in the group to which the major portion of his entrance belongs.

ADMISSION FROM OTHER COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

By direction of the University Faculty the credentials of students entering from other colleges and universities have been from 1896 to 1904 adjusted by the secretary of the Faculty concerned, except for entrance to the College of Arts and Sciences. The Registrar assumed in 1896 the work of adjusting such credentials for admission to Arts, and the elective system, begun in 1897, greatly facilitated · passage from other institutions to Cornell by reducing to a minimum the specific subjects required here for the A. B. degree. The restrictions as to choice of studies recently adopted by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences will doubtless affect transfers from other colleges. Students who had been attracted to Cornell were hitherto able to make the change to the College of Arts and Sciences and devote themselves to special fields unhampered by arrears of required work.

Since June, 1904 the Registrar has had charge of all credentials presented by applicants coming from other institutions and this system has given uniformity of action on similar certificates when the applicants enter different courses at this University.

In the following lists should properly be included a number of cases of special students who, coming from other colleges, would have been eligible for admission to advanced standing. Such students, however, preferred to be admitted as specials. Some of these later changed to a regular course but are not included in these tables.

The number of students admitted to advanced standing as can didates for the first degree during the past twenty years is, as nearly as may be ascertained, as follows:

1889-90

2

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No, of Year Arts Phil. Lett. Sci. Agr. Arch. Eng. Eng. estry Law* Vet. Med. Cases 1886-87 2 8 I I 4 6 18

50 1887-88 6 4 I II 10

37 1888-89 5

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2 2 I2 21

64
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69 1891-92 7 2 5 2 2 ΙΟ 52

90 1892-93

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87 1893-94 5 6 5 8

6 6

56 1994-95

4
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2
6 44

71 1895-96 5 II 4 7 3 3 9 33

85 1896-97 IO 2 4 3 3 II 42

12
5

100 1897-98 II

7 9 2 15

41
15 I

108 1898-99 27 6

5 3
16 56

6
3

134 1899-00 28 I 5 3 25

1 7 4

138 1900-0) 37

6
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134 1901-02 38

2 29
5 7

184 1902-03 33

24 105 9 I I

194 1903-04 31

9 5 39
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207 1904-05 29 9 5 44 IOI

3

201 1905-06 39 14 8 36 89

I

187 1906-07 40

19 5 55

86
15

220 Of the 220 admitted in 1905-1907, III registered as freshmen, 57 as sophomores, 39 as juniors, and 13 as seniors.

*No data prior to 1896-1897.

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