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On February 8, 1907, the above committee recommended to the Faculty the adoption of the following resolution :

“Resolved, That the University Faculty, recommend to the Board of Trustees the establishment of a graduate school under the administration of a separate Faculty, to consist of the professors in those departments in which graduate work is offered.”

After a brief debate it was moved and carried that the report of the committee be accepted and the committee discharged. It was apparent from the report that the committee felt that of the five topics referred to them to consider and report, the second was the most important and the others could be considered later.

At present the graduate work of the University is by statute placed under the direction of the l'niversity Faculty, and the Standing Committee on Graduate Work and Advanced Degrees has charge of the details of this work. In other words, there is no compactly organized graduate school or department, and the supervision of graduate work is only one of the many functions of the University Faculty. The Dean of the University Faculty, it is true, is ex-officio chairman of the Committee on Graduate Work, but he is also chairman of the other standing committees of the Faculty and it is impossible for him to devote himself exclusively to the interests of graduate work. A considerable part of his time is, however, absorbed in the details of admission to the graduate department and the routine work connected with the progress and graduation of students in that department. The efficiency of the graduate department would undoubtedly be increased if it were placed in charge of some officer directly responsible for its conduct, and whose energies were not divided among other interests. Whether this could be brought about by a smaller and more compact body of the University Faculty consisting of the professors in those departments in which graduate work is offered, with a dean or chairman of its own, is a question.

Some improvement might I think be made by entrusting to the various Colleges the management of advanced degrees which are purely technical in their nature. That is to say, the degrees of Master of Science in Agriculture, Master of Science in Architecture, Master of Civil Engineering, and Master of Mechanical Engineering. These degrees are purely technical, and concern not only the entire University but also especially the College with which they are inseparably connected. It is more difficult to arrange the details of the admission of candidates for these technical advanced degrees than those of candidates for the non-technical degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. The technical Colleges should have an opportunity to pass upon the admission of candidates for their master's degree, and they should have control of work which is practically done wholly or largely in the College. If the administration of these technical degrees were entrusted to the Colleges concerned, and the control of the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy retained by the University Faculty, there would be, I am sựre, a great saving in time and an improvement in the method of administering the graduate department which might then be more formally organized perhaps as a larger committee of the University Faculty under the charge of a chairman, not necessarily the Dean of the University Faculty. I regret that the report of the special committee received so little attention, and I trust that the whole subject may receive the careful consideration of the University Faculty next year.

I would again call attention to the question of Graduate Work done during the summer, either in the session of the Summer School or outside the session of the Summer School. As I have treated this subject fully in my report for last year ( pages XIV-XVI), I will say here only that some general policy should be adopted in regard to the matter. If students are to be allowed to pursue graduate work during the summer vacation outside of the Summer School, there should be some more definite organization and supervision of such work.

Graduate students who are not candidates for a degree, as well as those who are, have been required to work under the direction of a special committee of the Faculty. The numbers of such students for the past sixteen years has been as follows:

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The number of advanced degrees conferred during the years 1891-1907 was as follows:

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91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 'oo 'or 'o2 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 Tot.
6 6 4 8 2 10 16 14 20 19 22 12 23 13 10 196
2
3 I 3

9 I 3 2 3

9 7 7 6 10 -7 12 6 6 3 2 8 4 I 3 2 I 3 3

I I 34
3 14 16 8 15 6 2 7 4 10 4 7 6 9 4 4 125
3
8 4 16 13 14 II 23 7 19 20 23 20 13 21 19 19 153

3
6
3 3

18

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64

A.M. ----
Ph. M.
M.L.-
M.S.
M.C.E...
M.M.E.
Ph.D....
D.Sc.
M.S. in

Agr..--
M.S. in

Arch.

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Total.- 21 30 35 66 44 48 37 44 35 38 54 53 56 34 67 49 44 655

The candidates for advanced degrees during the years 1895-1907 were distributed as follows:

'03

'04

-

-

-- -

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1. By degrees: '95 '96 97 98 '99 'oo 'or '02

'05

'o6 '07 A.M.

3 3 14 19 31 35 45 40 55 40 50 41 54 Ph. M..

3

6 M.L.

7 4 M.S.

II

9 3 I M.S. in Agr. I 5 7 9 7 4 13 12 8

12

17 26 24 M.S.inArch. I I I I 3 I

2 3 3 2 2 M.C.E. 13 5 3 4 3 3 5 I 4 5 5 12 6 M.M.E. 36 18 ΙΟ II 12 9 17 15 16 19 22 15 20 Ph.D.

67 58 79 89 93 100 100 100 95 94 85 116 117 D.Sc.

31 22
16 II 6 2

3 2 2 2

Total

173 131 133 145 155 154 183 170 182 175 182 212 223

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12 17

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18 27

Political Science }

47 43 {

13 18 13 20

8 14

16 21

18 20
18 22
18 15

18 30

21 31
12 13

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II. By subjects (each minor counted separately) during the years 1894-1907: SUBJECT MAJOR

MINOR
'94-5 '95-6 '96-7'97-8'98-9'99-00'00-01'01-02'02-03'03-04'04-05'05-06'06-'07 '94-5 '95-6 '96-7 '97-8'98-9'99.00'00-01'01-02'02-03'03-04'04-05'05-06'06-07
Semitic Languages.

I
7 I I

I I

2 I I
Greek, Comp. Phil.- 7 2 5 5 7 8 6 6 6

3 4 4 19 15 13 14 18 17 16 II 14 14

II

9 9 Latin 3 4 3 4 4 4 7 5 7 9 3 5 6

5 3 3 3

6 7 7 5 8

3 4 3

6
Germanic Languages 4 4 4 I 2 2 3 4 7 3 3 4

5 5 7 8 7 8 9 9

6

3 4 6 Romance Languages.. 2 3 6 5 7 3 3 4

4 5 4 3 6 9 8 6

9 ୨

6 8 6 7 II English I2 II 12 II 12 12 10 7 4 4 7 7 IO

5 7 8 7 7

II 2 4 9 II Philosophy 20 20 14 15 13 15 14 13

II
14
16 35 37 30
35 32 22 20 24 22 18 17 23

21
Science and Art of Edu.
(previously under Philos. )-

2 3
6
2 I I

7 5 4 I 3

I ( 16 15 17 15 16 7 9 9 13

28 31 25 36 15

28 20 15 24 23

45 28 31 19 7 6 5 4 6 12 91 12 10 9 7 IO

17
Math. and Astron.. 5 4 4 3 7 8 6 6

9
6
12 27
17 25 18

21
Physics
15 9 12 12 12 IO 17

8 9 9 10 18

24 31 20 14

18 22

16 19 15 21 38 49 Chemistry

16 II 14 18 13 14 15 17

20 30 13 II 14

18 25 24

20
18

33
Botany, Arboriculture. 6 6
7 7 9 9 IO IO 13 IO

I2 14 15 19 15 20 22 19 21 18

20 29

23 Entomol., Gen. Inv. Zool. 2 I 2 3

9 9 10 10 14

4
3 10 II 15 18 16 IO

25
Physiol., Vertebrate Zool. 4 I 2

I 2
3 4 6 7

3 3 I 2 4

I 2 5 4 8 6
Anatomiy-
I

I

2

I
Microscopy, Embryol. --

I I 2

6 5 3 I 2

2 2 6 7 8

7 5 5 3 2 Geol., Paleont., Mineral. 2 2 4 4 4 3 5

4 7 3 5

8 11

II IO ΙΟ 14 9 15 13 9
Physical Geography

5
Medicine Anatomy)--

I 2

I

6 3 6
Agriculture
I 8 I 13 13 3 II II 5 13 13 31 27

ΙΟ 13 13

8 8 IO 5 IO 17 36 28
Horticulture

7 6
4
3 9 6

4 6 4 3 3 4 3 2
Forestry

2

2
Veterinary Medicine

I I 2

2 I 1 4

3 2 3 3 3

8

4 I 7 I Architecture I I I I 3 I 2 2 I 3 2

I I 3 I I

2 1

2 Civil Engineering 16 8 4 5 4 6 8

6 6 8 14

7 | 18 IO 6 9 8 6 7 II

9 Mechanical Engineering 38 20 13 12 15 10 19 18 19 17 19 17 20 31

II 14 10 17 19 16 13 17 16 17 Law

I

I

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15 16

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III. Actual number of students in each subject during the years 1894-1907 :
SUBJECT

'94-95 '95-96 '96-97 '97-98 '98-99 '99-00 '00-01 '01-02 '02-03 '03-04 '04-05 '05-06 '06-07
The Semitic Languages and Literatures.

I 2 I 1

I
Greek and Comparative Philosophy (including
Classical Archæology)
13 8 6 IO 14 16 14 II I 12

9 I 2
Latin

5 4 6 IO IT 13 9 15 14 II 8 I2 The Germanic Languages.

4 5 8 7 10 8 IO II 13 IO 5 7

8 The Romance Languages.

4 5 8 8 9 7 9 IO 9

8 6 8 IO English

15 16 19 14 13 14 13 15 4

6

9 14 Philosophy

24 22 19 22 18 19 17

18 14

16 19
Science and Art of Education (previously under
Philosophy)--

9 7 9

5

2
History, Ancient and Mediæval

12 8
5 7

4 II 18

II
22
16 26

31
Modern

15 SE 14
21 22 27 15 20

8

16 American

IO

9 15 12 15 14 14 15 9 IO II 10 Political Science and Social Science

23 12 9 15 13 14 9 7 9 14 17

18 Mathematics and Astronomy

23 18 18 18 23 18 21

23 24 Physics

36 21

19 24 18 22 18 21 22 20 33 41 Chemistry

17 13

19 14 17 20 21 26 26 23 35 33 Botany and Arboriculture

I2 13 14 15 16
17 19 15 19 13

20
Entomology and General Invertebrate Zoology- 9 4

4 10 14 22 20 18 18

18 28
Physiology, Vertebrate Zoology, and Neurology 5 3

2 3 5

4 5

8

9 13 7
Anatomical Methods and Human Anatomy

I
Microscopy, Histology, and Embryology.

3 3
8 12 13 IO IO 8

4 4 Geology, Paleontology, and Mineralogy

IO

IO 12 IO 13
Physical Geography
Medicine (Anatomy)

3

6 Agriculture.

4 7 10

7 13 14 9 15 19 36 31 Horticulture

5 10 I 2 II 9 II 8 7 4 10

4
Forestry

2
Veterinary Medicine

I

3 5 9 5 2 6 Architecture

I I 3

2 3

3 Civil Engineering

17 TO 5 6

5 7

8 6 7 II I 2 19 II Mechanical Engineering

38 23 16 14 17 II 22

23

20 20 21 Law

17

14 3543-37--45

2

2

2

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