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they have by selection of their work prepared themselves for such standing in some one department.

The committee in its partial report to be mentioned presently had no specific recommendation to make in regard to these points, although it felt that the adoption of some or all of them would increase the efficiency of the Graduate Department. It seemed to the committee that the most urgent need of the Graduate Department was its reorganization in some form which should concentrate responsibility in the hands of the persons actively engaged in the work of the Graduate Department. The Graduate Department as at present organized is in charge of the University Faculty and the Dean of the University Faculty is ex-officio chairman of the Committeee on Graduate Work, which is really the only organization responsible for the management and efficiency of the Graduate Department. This Committee now consists of eight members renewed from year to year. The chairman of the Committee, the Dean of the University Faculty, is responsible for the conduct of business and on him falls practically the entire routine work of the Graduate Department. The Dean is at present chairman of all the other standing committees of the University Faculty and is unable to devote his attention exclusively to any one of these committees. The Committee on Graduate Work is called together only when cases arise which the chairman does not feel authorized to settle and the Committee has no share in the routine work or any responsibility for its efficient conduct. The Committee also does not consider itself as a legislative body and rarely suggests improvements.

The committee of five above mentioned met with the Committee on Graduate Work and on June 12th made a report of progress to the University Faculty, recommending that beginning with September, 1909, there should be created a Graduate School with a faculty of its own, consisting of professors who in each year are actively engaged in supervising the work of graduate students as members of special committees in charge of major or minor subjects, these professsors to be designated by the President as soon as possible after the registration of graduate students in each year. The committee also recommended the creation of a new office, that of Dean of the Graduate School, the duties of that officer to be to serve as executive officer of the Graduate Faculty as above constituted and to conduct the work of the Graduate School under the direction of the Faculty of that School. This partial report of progress was accepted by the Faculty and the committee continued with the understanding that a final report should be presented as early as possible next year.

In my last report, page xx, I called attention for the second time to the question of, graduate work done during the summer, either in the session of the summer school or outside the session of the summer school. This subject has occupied the attention of the Committee on Graduate Work during the year and the necessity of some limitation of such work was recognized. The number of students taking work during the summer, either in the Summer Session or during the summer vacation, is increasing every year and will undoubtedly increase more rapidly when it is understood that work during the summer may in certain cases reduce the time required for the Doctor's degree from three years to two. The ordinary candidate receives credit for a year for the work done during the regular sessions of the University and if he continues his work privately during the summer vacation receives no credit for it. But the candidate pursuing work in botany, entomology and agricultural subjects may receive credit for one year and one third for the work done during the college year and the vacation. It is a very serious question whether this discrepency between various classes of candidates for the same degree should be allowed, but in my own judgment the most serious objection to work done during the summer is the fact that no organized provision exists for it outside of the brief Summer Session. It does not seem

ght to expect professors to remain in Ithaca during the summer giving instruction to graduate students and supervising their work, without extra compensation. At the same time it does not seem right to give credit toward a degree for work which is not pursued under substantially the same conditions as those which prevail at the regular sessions of the University. I trust that upon the reorganization of the Graduate Department this subject will receive prompt attention and the policy of the University in this important matter will be more clearly defined.

Graduate students who are not candidates for a degree, as well as those who are, have been required to work under the direction of a special committee of the Faculty. The numbers of such students for the past sixteen years have been as follows:

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The number of advanced degrees conferred during the years 1892–1908 was as follows:

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The candidates for advanced degrees during the years 1896-1908 were distributed as follows:

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Romance Languages 3 6 5 7 3 3 4

6
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English.

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Philosophy

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Science and Art of Edu.
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2 3
6

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History and

| 16 15 17 15 7 9 9 13

8 Political Science

7 6 5 4 6 I 2 9 5 Math. and Astron.

4 4 3 7

8 6 6 9 6 8 14 12
Physics

9 12 12 12 10 17 8 9 9 10 18 24 25
Chemistry

II 14 18 13 14 15 17 21 20 21 31 30 32
Botany, Arboriculture.

6
7 7 9 9 10 10 13 10 12 13 12

6 Entomol., Gen. Inv. Zool..

I 2 I 3
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Physiol., Vertebrate Zool.

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Anatomy
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Geol., Paleont., Mineral..
2 4 4 2 4 3 5 6

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Physical Geography.

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Medicine (Anatomy)

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The Semitic Languages and Literatures
Greek and Comparative Philology (including

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The Romance Languages
English
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der Philosophy)
History, Ancient and Mediæval

Modern

American
Political Science and Social Science
Mathematics and Astronomy
Physics
Chemistry
Botany and Arboriculture
Entomology and General Invertebrate Zoology
Physiology, Vertebrate Zoology and Neurology
Anatomical Methods and Human Anatomy
Microscopy, Histology and Embryology
Geology, Paleontology and Mineralogy
Physical Geography
Medicine (Anatomy)
Agriculture
Horticulture
Forestry
Veterinary Medicine
Architecture
Civil Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Law

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