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month. By this change the period of excitement for the teams was rendered less concentrated and intense than it has been in years when all the games were played off within three or four days, and the danger of excessive fatigue, it is thought, was distinctly lessened. The Rowing Club this spring has counted thirty-two members. They were coached first on the rowing machines and later on Lake Beebe by the rowing manager and Miss Canfield. The inter-class race between sophomores and freshmen was rowed at the end of the season and begins already to be something of a social event. The Tennis Club has used a court on the new athletic field as well as the two on the north side of Sage and has held its customary tournament with success at the close of the year. During the month of May, Miss Canfield has occasionally used the athletic field as the meeting place for regular gymnasium classes in order to have the benefit of the out-door air, and has substituted simple games for the ordinary exercises.

The Women's Self Government Association has continued to develop along lines both old and new. In the fall the new constitution described in the Warden's report of last year (p. lxxxviü) was formally adopted and put into force. Self government committees were organized in each house where women to the number of ten or more were living. Representatives from these house committees and also from the more scattered women meet together monthly in a general executive committee to pass upon all questions of more than local interest and to keep the several branches of the organization informed about one another. These general committee meetings proved from the outset surprisingly fruitful of discussion and suggestion and lasted often until late into the evening. Among the measures proposed and eventually carried through upon the Committee's recommendation were the creation of a special committee to have oversight and care of the “scattered” women who live singly or in little groups up and down the town, the installation of a “point system,” by which a limit is set to the number of student offices a woman may hold at any one time or in any one year, and the organization of a small “Census bureau" to keep record of the offices held by every student during the University course. The house committee at Sage College was considerably enlarged in order to make it more genuinely representative of the many different circles in the College constituency.

Early in November the president and a second delegate from the Association attended the Conference of the Intercollegiate Associa

course.

tion of Student Government Organizations at Mount Holyoke College. The secretary of the conference this year was also from Cornell and in addition the chairman of the student committee of the Alumnae House was sent by friends of the house. Thus four Cornell women enjoyed the stimulus and profit to be obtained from this gathering of the leading women of the principal colleges for women in the East. The invitation to hold the conference next November at Cornell was formally delivered and accepted. The president of the conference for next year will accordingly be a Cornell woman and an unusual opportunity to promote for the University a reputation for collegiate hospitality and courtesy will be in the hands of the officers of the Self Government Association and the women at large. The social life of the women of the University has gone its usual

The annual reception to the Faculty and Trustees was held in December. In April the Warden entertained the dean of Wells College and the house mistress of William Smith College for a day and a night, inviting the members of the senior class to meet them in the afternoon. At the same time the members of the Sage College house committee entertained the presidents of the Student Government Associations of those colleges and of the women of Syracuse University. The innumerable other functions of the year, teas, dinner parties, dances, excursions, stunts, and dramatics have duly taken place. A movement for raising the standard of the women's dramatics has been started and it is thought, will produce results another year.

The Warden has been at home to students regularly on Thursday evenings.

Several advocates of special causes have spoken in the Sage reception rooms, Miss Paxson on the student volunteer movement, Miss Holmquist on Christian Association work, Miss Smith on the Summer Bible School, Miss Helen Phelps Stokes and Miss Sanford on socialism, and Miss Caroline Lexow on equal suffrage. As a consequence of Miss Lexow's visit a branch of the National Equal Suffrage League was started among the students with a membership of about fifteen.

In closing my report I should like to make mention of the intelligent support and excellent service rendered throughout the year by Miss Hickman, Assistant to the Warden.

Respectfully submitted,
Louise Ropes Loomis,

Warden of Sage College

APPENDIX XIV

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR

To the President of the University:

Sir:--I have the honor to submit herewith my thirteenth annual report as Registrar of the University. The report covers the academic year 1908-1909, including the Summer Session of 1909.

15

THE YEAR

Days in Sun

Session days
First term, Sept. 29-Jan. 27

89
First term, vacation, Jan. 28, 29
Christmas vacation, Dec. 23-Jan. 5
Second term, Jan. 30-June 17

18
Easter vacation, April 3-April 12
Summer vacation, June 18-July 4
Summer Session, July 5-Aug 13

35 5 Summer vacation, Aug. 14-Sept. 27

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Holi. Vaca-
days tion Total
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107 2 2

14 14 2

129 IO IO 17 17

40 45 45

In addition to the 233 days in session given above, the University Library was open every day in the year except holidays and there was no time during the year when college activities entirely ceased. The shops and some of the laboratories were also open during nearly all the vacation period.

STUDENTS

The table given on page cxvii, which shows the attendance for 1908-1909, gives the number of students who have received instruction this year, including those in the 1909 Summer Session and in the Winter Courses in Agriculture, but excluding duplicates, as 4,859, an increase over last year's attendance of 394.

The accompanying table shows the attendance in each course since the opening of the University in 1868. Previous to 1897 optional and special students were separately tabulated but now these are distributed as far as possible among the groups to which they belong

OPENING OF THE UNIVERSITY IN 1868.

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185 145 161 166 190 174 305 189301 197 211 732 339 2491 310

47 66 77 Arts aná Scii

75.

694 631 680 755 831 795734 684 705 748 870 903 Arts

165 132 166 200 Letters

85 65 Literaturo

50 27
Philosophy
History and

137) 155 157
Mathematics
Science and
Science
Natural Hist 105 131 151 171
Chemistry
Medical Prep 8

7 8 Agriculture

45 45 SI 68 84 85 88 99 92 I14 Mechanical E

149 189 230 278 348 415 221 209 Mechanic Ar 250

245 467 soi 571 661 792 891 964 1060 1090 10811127 1163 Electrical E Industrial Al

332 389 395 Civil Engine

120 123 122 Architecture

153 179 185 203 183 314 352 326 385 425 466 511 569 97 76 67 51 53 48 43 52 Law

SO 53 65 68 81 82 TOO! 133 197 191 307 239 246 164 178 182 198 224 Veterinary

240 228 722

211

906 16

23 30 42 51 64 86 ΙΙο 88 86 Forestry.

82 94 7 20 23 Medical

70

178 333 347 Pharmacy

433 396 371 406 394 348 320 131

Total e 1810 1689 1702 1808 1835 2101 2299 2527 2845 3072 3091 3318 3461 3523 3734 3985

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Summer Sess

277 272 Summer Ent

19 Summer Sch Summer Pal Winter Agric 61

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424 548 470 718 619 642 755) 841 889 30

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96 121 134

199 148 244 270 364 II 8 3 1

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ley belong. The classification of "Optionals" was always vague, and

lession of 1892.

APPENDIX XIV

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR

To the President of the University:

Sir:- I have the honor to submit herewith my thirteenth annual
report as Registrar of the University. The report covers the aca-
demic year 1908-1909, including the Summer Session of 1909.

THE YEAR

Days in Sun-

Session days
First term, Sept. 29--Jan. 27

89 15
First term, vacation, Jan. 28, 29
Christmas vacation, Dec. 23-Jan. 5
Second term, Jan. 30-June 17

109 18
Easter vacation, April 3-April 12
Summer vacation, June 18-July 4
Summer Session, July 5-Aug 13.

35

5
Summer vacation, Aug. 14-Sept. 27

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In addition to the 233 days in session given above, the Univer-
sity Library was open every day in the year except holidays and
there was no time during the year when college activities entirely
ceased. The shops and some of the laboratories were also open
during nearly all the vacation period.

STUDENTS

The table given on page cxvii, which shows the attendance for
1908-1909, gives the number of students who have received instruc-
tion this year, including those in the 1909 Summer Session and in
the Winter Courses in Agriculture, but excluding duplicates, as
4,859, an increase over last year's attendance of 394.

The accompanying table shows the attendance in each course
since the opening of the University in 1868. Previous to 1897
optional and special students were separately tabulated but now
these are distributed as far as possible among the groups to which
they belong

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