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Total 389 297 311 361 358 375 463 520 617 557 573 609 658 584 792 905

The Regents' credentials mentioned above do not include medical and veterinary student certificates.

The discrepancy in numbers in the freshman class compared with those given in the Register, is due to students being there listed as freshmen because of some shortage when otherwise they belong to a higher class.

The small number credited to entrance by examination would become much larger if those taking a few examinations to make up a shortage in another group were included. It is not unusual to have a student enter partially by certificate, by examination, and by College Board examination. The combining of school with Regents' credentials, however, is not a common method of admission and is employed only in very exceptional cases.

It should be noted that the number entering entirely by our examinations is small. The preparatory schools are now better acquainted with our entrance requirements. Certain Regents' credentials admit to the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, of Agriculture, and of Law, and under certain conditions relieve all students from taking an entrance examination in English. Regents' pass cards for single subjects are accepted if the grade be at least 60%, the University Faculty having agreed to accept the Regents' pass of 60% for the years 1909 to 1913 inclusive. The failure of several students to pass the entrance examination before completing the high school course has influenced others to complete their course in school and enter the University by certificate.

PETITIONS

The usual form of petition has been continued by the several Faculties. Where the petition relates to routine matters and a mere change of registration of studies, a much simpler method has been adopted for changes in registration, and the strict enforcement of registration rules has made a marked improvement in the students' work. The Faculties of Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, Civil En

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Bachelors 29 31

53 129 189 18) 212 181 147 154 173 Bachelors

25 Bachelors

52 43 49 44 26 40

484 Bachelors 20 12 3 5

264 Bachelors 23

23 34 57 59 Bachelors

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42 162 Bachelors

19 Bachelors

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gineering, Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine have filed the petitions in the offices of these Colleges and have notified the Registrar of the action taken; while the Law and Mechanical Engineering Faculties have returned the petitions to this office and the office has notified the students by mail.

The registration of old students takes place after the matriculation of new students. This allows new students a day to arrange their work before instruction begins. Old students are not required to be at the University until the day preceding the one on which instruction begins. The system of registering new students in September in groups according as their names appear in the alphabet, and of sending out by mail permits for registration has solved the overcrowding of registration and gives each student abundant time to get started aright.

The inserted table gives the number admitted to graduation at the 1909 Commencement as well as those of former years. 11,236 degrees have been conferred, but there are some duplicates between the first and second degrees. One degree (M.D.) was conferred in 1899, but in 1907 was revoked because the candidate declined to accept it. One degree (D.V.M.) was conferred in June, 1905, but owing to a technicality was withdrawn and conferred again June, 1906, while another degree (D.V.M.) was conferred in 1907 but dated as June, 1906. Care has been taken to discriminate between closely allied degrees, but such have been grouped so as to show at a glance the number in each department.

Respectfully submitted,
David F. Hoy,

Registrar

APPENDIX XV

REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN

To the President of the University:

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith my annual report on the University Library for the year ending June 30th, 1909.

The following table shows the additions made to the various collections composing the University Library and the total present extent of the Library:

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The term "general library" includes the President White Historical Library, the Fiske collections, and the seminary and department collections not separately enumerated. Of the accessions to the general library (numbering 11,452 volumes) 4,613 were gifts. Of the accessions to the other collections named in the table, the gifts number 66 volumes for the Law Library, 21 volumes for the Flower library, 19 volumes for the Barnes library, 52 volumes for the Goldwin Smith Hall library, 118 volumes for the Stimson Hall library, and 35 volumes for the library of the Agricultural College which is now being formed by purchases from the College funds.

The gifts of the year include an interesting collection of manuscript notebooks and scrapbooks, containing a great mass of material

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