The Bible, Theology, and Faith: A Study of Abraham and Jesus

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Cambridge University Press, 27 .. 2000 - 263 ˹
How can academic biblical interpretation fruitfully contribute to Christian belief and living in today's world? This book offers a synthesis of some of the best in pre-modern, modern and post-modern approaches to biblical interpretation, and locates the discipline within a self-critical Trinitarian rule of faith, where historical criticism, systematic theology, ethics, and spirituality are constructively combined. Moberly reclaims biblical and patristic principles of what is necessary for meaningful and truthful speech about God to be possible; he engages with contemporary ideological suspicions directed both to scripture and to its interpreters; and he offers an account of God and humanity in relation to both Old and New Testaments. Hermeneutical theory is given practical shape in in-depth studies of Genesis 22 ('The Akedah'), the Journey to Emmaus (Luke 24), and the Christology of Matthew's Gospel, studies which should be of interest to both Jews and Christians.
 

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The Bible the question of God and Christian faith
1
Christ as the key to scripture the journey to Emmaus
45
Abraham and God in Genesis 22
71
Ancient and modern interpretations of Genesis 22
132
Genesis 22 and the hermeneutics of suspicion
162
Jesus in Matthews Gospel as Son of God
184
Summary and prospect
225
References
243
Index of scriptural references
251
Index of names
259
Index of subjects
262
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