Killing the Indian Maiden: Images of Native American Women in Film

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University Press of Kentucky, 15 .. 2006 - 298 ˹
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Since the end of the Cold War, and especially since September 11, few issues have been more hotly debated than the United States' role in the world. In this hard-nosed but sophisticated examination, Colin S. Gray argues that America is the indispensable guardian of world order. Gray's constructive critique of recent trends in national security is holistic, rooting defense issues and prospective answers both in U.S. national security policy, broadly defined, and in the emerging international security environment. Colin S. Gray is professor of international politics and strategic studies at the University of Reading, England, and senior fellow at the National Institute for Public Policy in Fairfax, Virginia. He is the author of seventeen books, including Modern Strategy and Strategy for Chaos: Revolutions in Military Affairs and the Evidence of History.

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1 Death Gratitude and the Squaw Mans Wife
25
2 WhitePainted Lady
61
3 What Lies Beneath the Surface
89
4 The Only Good Indian Is a Dead Indian
133
5 Free Love and Violence
167
6 Ghosts and Vanishing Indian Women
197
Into the Twentyfirst Century
227
Filmography
233
Notes
241
Works Cited
271
Index
285
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˹ 4 - Racial projects do the ideological "work" of making these links. A racial project is simultaneously an interpretation, representation, or explanation of racial dynamics, and an effort to reorganize and redistribute resources along particular racial lines. Racial projects connect what race means in a particular discursive practice and the ways in which both social structures and everyday experiences are racially organized, based upon that meaning.
˹ 8 - America's oldest and most cherished fantasy: a daily reality of harmony between man and nature based on / an experience of the land as essentially feminine that is, not simply * the land as mother, but the land as woman, the total female principle of gratification...

ǡѺ (2006)

M. Elise Marubbio is an assistant professor of American Indian Studies, English, Film, and Women's Studies at Augsburg College. She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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