Devils and Angels: Textual Editing and Literary Theory

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University of Virginia Press, 1991 - 212 ˹
Literary theory and textual criticism have much to teach each other, writes Philip Cohen, who has collected this anthology of essays that seeks to bridge what he sees as a wide rift between textual and literary critics. While most Anglo-American textual scholars now stress the importance of authorial intention and its key role in editorial and interpretative work, many literary theorists still tend to ostracize the author and his intentions from any serious literary discussion. Any observer of the contemporary literary scene quickly notes the following paradox - many theorists refute the usefulness of authorial intention in their discussion and evaluation of texts composed with help from that very intention. This conundrum yields a great impasse: literary interpretation depends, to a degree, on which text the critic chooses to read.
 

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Literary Pragmatics and the Editorial Horizon
1
The Autonomous Author the Sociology of Texts and
22
A Response to McGann
44
Procedures
57
The Manifestation and Accommodation of Theory
78
Notes on Emerging Paradigms in Editorial Theory
103
Greetham and Cohen and Jackson
124
Unsought Encounters
152
1o The Textual Event
167
A Response to Gabler McLaverty
195
Index
209
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Philip Cohen is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Texas at Arlington. His articles have appeared in such journals as American Literature, The Faulkner Journal, Southern Literary Journal, Comparative Literature Studies, and Journal of Modern Literature.

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