First lines of therapeutics, lectures, Ѻ 334

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Appleton, 1879 - 278 ˹
 

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˹ 79 - And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and bread and flesh in the evening; and he drank of the brook.
˹ 196 - FIRST LINES OF THERAPEUTICS ; as based on the Modes and the Processes of Healing, as occurring Spontaneously in Disease ; and on the Modes and the Processes of Dying, as resulting Naturally from Disease. In a series of Lectures. Post 8vo, 5s.
˹ 79 - ... they had been foundling asylums, relieving the state of many orphan and outcast children, and ministering to their necessities, God's ravens in the wilderness...
˹ 79 - ... they had been inns for the way-faring man, " who heard from afar the sound of the vesper-bell, at once " inviting him to repose and devotion, and who might sing his " matins with the morning star, and go on his way rejoicing...
˹ 194 - It is an important practical error," he also continues, "to fix the attention, particularly of students of the profession, too much on those characters of disease which are drawn from changes of structure already effected, and to trust too exclusively to these as the diagnostics of different diseases ; because in many instances, these characters are not clearly perceptible until the latest and least remediable stage of diseases. The very object of the most important practice, moreover, in many cases,...
˹ 78 - ... suspected of entertaining unnecessary alarm, nor of dwelling too long upon the dark side of the picture. Let us believe rather that these are the times and that this is the occasion demanding that we look all the facts of our situation squarely in the face. It is true we have existed a hundred years, and a century is but a span in the life of a nation. If there be any form of government destined in the order of Providence to an indefinite perpetuity, that government ought to be " of the people,...
˹ 79 - ... the event proved that they had their redeeming qualities too; and as we know not, says the proverb, what the well is worth till it is dry, so was it found after the dissolution, that, with all their faults, the monasteries had been the refuge for the destitute who were now driven to frightful extremities throughout the country, the effect of the suppression being with respect to them the same as would now follow from the sudden abolition of the poor laws...
˹ 87 - Nature are not so well understood as to enable us to regulate them properly, and so make them the basis of our indications of treatment
˹ 79 - They had been the alms-houses, where the aged dependants " of more opulent families, the decrepid servant, the decayed " artificer retired as to a home, neither uncomfortable nor "humiliating; they had been the county infirmaries and " dispensaries a knowledge of medicine and of the virtues " of herbs being a department of monkish learning (as " passages in the old dramatic writers sometimes indicate...
˹ 243 - ... required, not in order that sensations may be felt, but that they may be remembered, and availed of for useful purposes, not in order that volitions may act as stimuli on muscles, but that they may be so excited, and so succeed one another, as to produce regular and useful voluntary actions, under the guidance of desires, and of...

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