The Great English Novelists, 2

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William James Dawson, Coningsby Dawson
Harper & brothers, 1911
 

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˹ 151 - A soldier, an* please your reverence, said I, prays as often (of his own accord) as a parson ; and when he is fighting for his king, and for his own life, and for his honour, too, he has the most reason to pray to God of any one in the whole world.
˹ 160 - He hath destroyed me on every side, and I am gone: and mine hope hath he removed like a tree.
˹ 139 - Call upon Me in the day of trouble, and I will deliver, and thou shalt glorify Me.
˹ 280 - My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things, seems to me to have been gained on a memorable raw afternoon toward evening. At such a time I found out for certain that this bleak place overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip, late of this parish and also Georgiana wife of the above...
˹ 52 - You need be under no uneasiness," cried I, "about selling the rims, for they are not worth sixpence; for I perceive they are only copper varnished over.
˹ 172 - I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation ; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart.
˹ 146 - Europe when my uncle Toby was one evening getting his supper, with Trim sitting behind him at a small sideboard, I say, sitting for in consideration of the corporal's lame knee (which sometimes gave him exquisite pain) when my uncle Toby dined or supped alone, he would never suffer the corporal to stand ; and the poor fellow's veneration for his master was such, that, with a proper artillery, my uncle Toby could have taken...
˹ 280 - A fearful man, all in coarse grey, with a great iron on his leg. A man with no hat, and with broken shoes, and with an old rag tied round his head. A man who had been soaked in water, and smothered in mud, and lamed by stones, and cut by flints, and stung by nettles, and torn by briars ; who limped and shivered, and glared and growled; and whose teeth chattered in his head as he seized me by the chin. "O! Don't cut my throat, sir,
˹ 76 - Brick Lane Branch of the United Grand Junction Ebenezer Temperance Association, were held in a large room, pleasantly and airily situated at the top of a safe and commodious ladder.
˹ 148 - My uncle Toby laid down his knife and fork, and thrust his plate from before him, as the landlord gave him the account; and Trim, without being ordered, took away without saying one word, and in a few minutes after brought him his pipe and tobacco. Stay in the room a little, said my uncle Toby.