Redefining the New Woman, 1920-1963, 2

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Angela Howard, Sasha Ranaé Adams Tarrant
Taylor & Francis, 1997 - 329 ˹
2. Redefining the New Woman, 1920-1963 Despite the fact that women's suffrage did not produce the catastrophic consequences predicted, mainstream opposition to the feminist movement refused to die, as exemplified in commentaries by industrialist Henry Ford, renowned literary figures D.H. Lawrence and Norman Mailer, and even presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson, all represented in this volume. The other selections first focus on sources published during the interwar years and indicate that the legacy of progressive social feminism exacerbated reactionary attitudes toward women in the context of postwar political fundamentalism, the Great Depression, and the New Deal. The second part contains literature that appeared between 1941 and 1963, and reflects the ambivalence and backlash toward wives and mothers in the workforce and the public sphere, driven by the social, political, and economic conservatism of the Cold War Era.
 

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Reaction to the Modern Womens Movement 1963 to the Present
3
The Unfemale Feminine
7
The Collapse of Feminism
15
Seven Deadly Sins of Woman in Business
21
The Problem of Women in Industry
30
Feminism Destructive of Womans Happiness
44
Second Thoughts on Feminism
52
The Enfranchisement of the Girl of Twentyone
63
What More Do Women Want?
137
A Word to Women
147
Is Feminism Decadent?
157
The Disadvantages of Womens Rights
173
Deterrents to Parenthood
211
American Womans Dilemma
217
Should Mothers Work?
226
Social Psychological Correlates of Upward Social Mobility
240

Public OpinionWomen in Industry
70
Womans Encroachment on Mans Domain
81
McMenamin
86
This TwoHeaded MonsterThe Family
96
Common Problems of Professional Women
106
Chivalry and Labor Laws
114
My GreatGrandmothers Were Happy
247
The Passage Through College
259
Women Husbands and History
276
Table of Traits Assigned to Male and Female
301
Acknowledgments
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Angela Howard-Zophy, Associate Professor of History and Women's Studies at the University of Houston Clear Lake, is editor of the award-winning Handbook of American Women's History (Garland, 1990). She holds a Ph.D. degree in history from Ohio State University, and is the editor of the Garland series: The Development of American Feminism well as Directories of Minority Women, and is the author of numerous articles, book chapters, and essays.

Sasha Rana Adams Tarrant assisted editorially with the revised edition of the Handbook of American Women's History, as well as contributed the entry on antifeminism to the volume. She holds B.A. and M.A. degrees in history from the University of Houston Clear Lake, and is currently completing her doctorate in U.S. and women's history at Texas A. & M. University.