The State and the Mass Media in Japan, 1918-1945

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University of California Press, 26 .. 1993 - 356 ˹
Gregory Kasza examines state-society relations in interwar Japan through a case study of public policy toward radio, film, newspapers, and magazines.
 

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˹ 10 - The Emperor issues, or causes to be issued, the ordinances necessary for the carrying out of the laws, or for the maintenance of the public peace and order, and for the promotion of the welfare of the subjects. But no ordinance shall in any way alter any of the existing laws.
˹ 11 - Were administrative measures placed under the control of the judicature, and were courts of justice charged with the duty of deciding whether a particular administrative measure was or was not proper, administrative authorities would be in a state of subordination to judicial functionaries. The consequence would be that the administrative would be deprived of freedom of action in securing benefits to society and happiness to the people.
˹ 9 - Belief and conviction are operations of the mind. As to forms of worship, to religious discourses, to the mode of propagating a religion and to the formation of religious associations and meetings, some general legal or police restrictions must be observed for the maintenance of public peace and order.
˹ 8 - Japanese subjects shall, within limits not prejudicial to peace and order, and not antagonistic to their duties as subjects, enjoy freedom of religious belief. Article XXIX. Japanese subjects shall, within the limits of law, enjoy the liberty of speech, writing, publication, public meetings and associations.

ǡѺ (1993)

Gregory J. Kasza is Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Political Science at Indiana University, Bloomington.

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