The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, 2

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J. Murray, 1871 - 491 ˹
 

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Ԩóҡ  - Britt84 - LibraryThing

Very interesting to read, and definitely a very important work of science, though nowadays somewhat outdated... I do very much enjoy and appreciate Darwin's writings. He is very thorough and really ... ҹԴ繩Ѻ

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Ԩóҡ  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

This is a difficult book to read in some ways. The main one being that it is so dense, the amount of information, observations, and evidence presented to the reader is staggering, all of it with the ... ҹԴ繩Ѻ

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˹ 381 - But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her, for her hair is given her for a covering.
˹ 404 - Important as the struggle for existence has been and even still is, yet as far as the highest part of man's nature is concerned there are other agencies more important. For the moral qualities are advanced, either directly or indirectly, much more through the effects of habit, the reasoning powers, instruction, religion, etc., than through natural selection...
˹ 402 - He is impelled by nearly the same motives as are the lower animals when left to their own free choice, though he is in so far superior to them that he highly values mental charms and virtues. On the other hand he is strongly attracted by mere wealth or rank. Yet he might by selection do something not only for the bodily constitution and frame of his offspring, but for their intellectual and moral qualities.
˹ 386 - He who is not content to look, like a savage, at the phenomena of nature as disconnected, cannot any longer believe that man is the work of a separate act of creation.
˹ 405 - I have given the evidence to the best of my ability ; and we must acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man, with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men, but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system with all these exalted powers Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin.
˹ 362 - We may indeed conclude from what we know of the jealousy of all male quadrupeds, armed, as many of them are, with special weapons for battling with their rivals, that promiscuous intercourse in a state of nature is extremely improbable.
˹ 327 - The chief distinction in the intellectual powers of the two sexes is shown by man's attaining to a higher eminence, in whatever he takes up, than can woman - whether requiring deep thought, reason, or imagination, or merely the use of the senses and hands.
˹ 395 - The idea of a universal and beneficent Creator of the universe does not seem to arise in the mind of man, until he has been elevated by long-continued culture.
˹ 403 - Man, like every other animal, has no doubt advanced to his present high condition through a struggle for existence, consequent on his rapid multiplication, and if he is to advance still higher it is to be feared that he must remain subject to a severe struggle ; otherwise he would sink into indolence, and the more gifted men would not be more successful in the battle of life than the less gifted.

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