The Philosophy of the Christian Religion

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Macmillan, 1902 - 583 ˹
Book I. Questions in the philosophy of nature and mind which affect belief in the supernatural person. -- book II. The person of Christ and the making of the Christian religion.
 

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˹ 567 - God. And the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us (and we beheld his glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father), full of grace and truth.
˹ 52 - one substance, with two sets of properties, two sides, the physical and the mental a double-faced unity...
˹ 413 - And Jesus went into the temple of God, and cast out all them that sold and bought in the temple, and overthrew the tables of the moneychangers, and the seats of them that sold doves, and said unto them, It is written, My house shall be called the house of prayer ; but ye have made it a den of thieves.
˹ 78 - The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.
˹ 95 - Nature impales men, breaks them as if on the wheel, casts them to be devoured by wild beasts, burns them to death, crushes them with stones like the first christian martyr, starves them with hunger, freezes them with cold, poisons them by the quick or slow venom of her exlialations, and has hundreds of other hideous deaths \ in reserve, such as the ingenious cruelty of a Nabis or a Domitian never surpassed.
˹ 415 - And said, This fellow said, I am able to destroy the temple of God, and to build it in three days.
˹ 131 - Higher still and higher, From the earth thou springest, Like a cloud of fire The blue deep thou wingest, And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest. In the golden lightning Of the sunken sun, O'er which clouds are bright'ning, Thou dost float and run Like an unbodied joy, whose race is just begun.
˹ 52 - ... the promise and the potency of every form and quality of life.
˹ 507 - For the love of Christ constraineth us because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead ; and that he died for all, that they who live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto him who died for them and rose again.
˹ 398 - But when he had turned about and looked on his disciples, he rebuked Peter, saying, Get thee behind me, Satan: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but the things that be of men.

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