Kierkegaard's Metaphors

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Mercer University Press, 2001 - 201 ˹
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Keirkegaard's Metaphors offers an explaination of a more accessible way to understand Kierkegarrd by analyzing his persistent use of metaphors.
 

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Deceiving into the Truth Metaphor and Indirect Communication the Maieutic
27
Metaphoric ThoughtExperiments Godly Satires and Structuring a Maieutic Authorship in a World of Direct Communication
36
C The Fork
41
D Languages Inadequacies Existentialist Writing and Becoming Human through a Persona
46
E Language Decay Ambiguities Opposition and the Need for Passionate Tension
56
Concealing Collisions of the Self The Esthetic Poetization or Metaphor
69
the Romantic Tradition
81
C Becoming Entangled in Metaphor and Acting Fatally
86
C You Are the One
111
Enacting Collisions of the Self The Religious Literalization of Metaphor
121
The Coming into Existence of Metaphor
127
B Rejecting or Annulling Metaphor to Embrace It Existentially
139
C Enacting and Literalizing Metaphor through Imitation Suffering and Atonement
150
D The Woman Who Was a Sinner
159
Metaphor and Dying to the World
165
Works Cited
173

Disclosing Collisions of the Self The Ethical Analysis of Metaphor
97
Ethical Actualitys Terrifying MatterofFact Task
104

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˹ 10 - Man is a synthesis of the infinite and the finite, of the temporal and the eternal, of freedom and necessity, in short it is a synthesis.

ǡѺ (2001)

Jamie Lorentzen earned a BA in Philosophy at St. Olaf's College & an MA in English from the Bread Loaf School of English. He chairs the Friends of the Howard & Edna Hong Kierkegaard Library, St. Olaf College. He currently is working on a comparative study of Kierkegaard's "Concluding Unscientific Postscript" & Melville's "Moby-Dick".

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