Attila: A Romance, 1

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˹ 168 - Jungle swallowed up the walls,' said Hathi. 'And what more?' said Mowgli. 'As much good ground as I can walk over in two nights from the east to the west, and from the north to the south as much as I can walk over in three nights, the Jungle took.
˹ 12 - Thou hast roused up the birds, thou hast wakened the flowers, To chant on thy path, and to perfume the hours. Then slow, mighty wanderer, sink to thy rest, And rise again beautiful, blessing, and blest. Slow, slow, mighty wanderer, sink to thy rest, Yet pause but a moment to shed One warm look of love on the earth's dewy breast, Ere the starr'd curtain fall round thy bed.
˹ 46 - Then shall they begin to say to the mountains : Fall upon us ; and to the hills : Cover us. For if in the green wood they do these things, what shall be done in the dry ? And there were also two other malefactors led with Him to be put to death.
˹ 12 - Slow, slow, mighty wanderer, sink to thy rest, Prolonging the sweet evening hour ; Then robe again soon in the morn's golden vest, To go forth in thy beauty and power. Yet pause on thy way To the full height of day, For thy rising and setting are blest. When thou com'st after darkness to gladden our eyes, Or departest in glory, in glory to rise, May hope and may prayer still be woke by thy rays, And thy going be marked with thanksgiving and praise.
˹ 12 - Since thy rising, oh! sun, May thou and thy Maker be blest. Thou hast scattered the night from thy broad golden way, Thou hast given us thy light through a long happy day, Thou hast roused up the birds, thou hast wakened the flowers, To chant on thy path, and to perfume the hours. Then slow, mighty wanderer, sink to thy rest, And rise again beautiful, blessing, and blest.
˹ 149 - IT ia a strange and awful sensation, when, after having enjoyed, to the full, the powers and energies of manhood, we find ourselves suddenly reduced by the unnerving hand of sickness to the feebleness of infancy, when giant strength lies prostrate, and busy activity is chained to the weary bed. It is strange, and it is awful ; for it shows us most sensibly how frail a thing is that vigour which, in our boisterous days of health, we madly think an adamantine armour against all adversity. It is...
˹ 13 - When thou com'st after darkness to gladden our eyes, Or departest in glory, in glory to rise, May hope and may prayer still be woke by thy rays, And thy going be marked with thanksgiving and praise. Then slow, mighty wanderer, sink to thy rest, And rise again, beautiful, blessing and blest.
˹ 159 - I will tell her/' she added, with a faint smile, " I will tell her ; and you shall see how calmly I can talk of your departure." .' She then spoke for some time longer, in a tranquil tone, of 'all the arrangements that were to be made; and as she did so, still, from time to time, her eyes were raised to the young Roman's face with a long, earnest glance, as if she would fain have fixed his image upon memory, so that no years could blot it out.
˹ 159 - Make me not regret and yet love me so still. Forget, too, that I love you better, but oh, believe that no sister ever yet lived that will do for you what Neva will ; and in the moment of danger, in the hour of sickness, in the time of...
˹ 158 - ... loved; with her head supported on his shoulder, she turned her face to his bosom, and wept long and bitterly. Theodore said little, but all he did say were words of kindness and of comfort ; and Neva seemed to feel them as such, and thanked him by a gentle pressure of the hand. At length she spoke. " I had thought," she said, in the undisguised simplicity of her heart, " I had thought to be your first and only wife.