Sidgwick's Ethics and Victorian Moral Philosophy

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Clarendon Press, 1977 - 465 ˹
Henry Sidgwick's The Methods of Ethics challenges comparison, as no other work in moral philosophy, with Aristotle's Ethics in the depth of its understanding of practical rationality, and in its architectural coherence it rivals the work of Kant. In this historical, rather than critical study,
Professor Schneewind shows how Sidgwick's arguments and conclusions represent rational developments of the work of Sidgwick's predecessors, and brings out the nature and structure of the reasoning underlying his position.
 

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The Development of Sidgwicks Thought
13
Intuitionism and Common Sense
63
The Cambridge Moralists
89
The Early Utilitarians I 22
122
The Reworking of Utilitarianism
152
The Aims and Scope of The Methods of Ethics
191
Reason and Action
215
Acts and Agents
237
The SelfEvident Axioms
286
The Transition to Utilitarianism
310
Utilitarianism and its Method
329
Sidgwick and the Later Victorians
383
Sidgwick and the History of Ethics
412
Manuscripts and Published Writings
423
Index
457
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The Examination of CommonSense Morality
260

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