Richard F. Burton ...: His Early, Private and Public Life; with an Account of His Travels and Explorations, 1

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S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, 1887
 

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˹ iii - I fared like a distressed Prince who calls in a powerful neighbour to his aid. I was undone by my auxiliary. When I had once called him in, I could not subsist without dependence on him.
˹ 185 - Around lie drifted sand-heaps, upon which each puff of wind leaves its trace in solid waves, frayed rocks, the very skeletons of mountains, and hard unbroken plains, over which he who rides is spurred by the idea that the bursting of a waterskin, or the pricking of a camel's hoof, would be a certain death of torture ; a haggard land infested with wild beasts and wilder men ; a region whose very fountains murmur the warning words " Drink and away !
˹ 186 - In the desert, spirituous liquors excite only disgust. There is a keen enjoyment in a mere animal existence.
˹ 302 - Sea, and commenting on the political measures of the Government of India, I am directed by the Right Honourable the Governor in Council to state, your want of discretion, and due respect for the authorities to whom you are subordinate, has been regarded with displeasure by Government. " I have the honour to be, Sir, " Your most obedient Servant, " (Signed) HL ANDERSON, " Secretary to Government. " Bombay Castle, 23rd July, 1857.
˹ 93 - They are powerful in the field, successful against their enemies, impatient of anything like slavery; vastly fond of great noises that fill the ear, such as the firing of cannon, drums, and the ringing of bells, so that it is common for a number of them, that have got a glass in their heads, to go up into the belfry, and ring the bells for hours together for the sake of exercise.
˹ 222 - Then, having bathed and perfumed ourselves the latter is a questionable point we donned the attire, which is nothing but two new cotton cloths, each six feet long by three and a half broad, white, with narrow red stripes and fringes: in fact, the costume called Al-Eddeh, in the baths at Cairo.
˹ 230 - mineralogically " a "block of volcanic basalt, whose circumference is sprinkled with little crystals, pointed and straw-like, with rhombs of tile-red feldspath upon a dark background, like velvet or charcoal, except one of its protuberances, which is reddish.
˹ 93 - they are vastly fond of great noises that fill the ear, such as the firing of cannon, beating of drums, and the ringing of bells ; so that it is common for a number of them that have got a glass in their heads to get up into some belfry and ring the bells for hours together for the sake of exercise.
˹ 205 - O Lord, cause me to enter the Entering of Truth, and cause me to issue forth the Issuing of Truth, and permit me to draw near to Thee, and make me a Sultan Victorious*!
˹ 177 - Further, the dervish is allowed to ignore ceremony and politeness, as one who ceases to appear upon the stage of life ; he may pray or not, marry or remain single as he pleases, be respectable in cloth of frieze as in cloth of gold, and no one asks him the chartered vagabond Why he comes here ? or, Wherefore he goes there ? He may wend his way on foot...

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