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" The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. "
The Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas - ˹ 5
Edward Westermarck - 1906
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The Begum's Millions

Jules Verne - 2005 - 261 ˹
...to whimsically bring up his utilitarian theories, such as that articulated in Mill's famous apothegm "Actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness." Since thinking of Jeanne clearly makes Marcel happy, it is the right thing. Verne could also be referring...
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Quagmires and Quandaries: Exploring Journalism Ethics

Ian Richards - 2005 - 178 ˹
...informed citizenry. Central to this perspective is Mill's principle of utility, according to which 'actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness' (p. 7). Many objections can be - and have been - made to utilitarianism, and some of these are particularly...
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The Repugnant Conclusion: Essays on Population Ethics

Jesper Ryberg, Torbjörn Tännsjö - 2007 - 261 ˹
...famous and pristine conflations of the positive and negative imperatives: Mill (1979/1861) tells us that "actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to promote the reverse of happiness," and that "By happiness is intended pleasure and the absence of pain;...
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Transcultural Health and Social Care: Development of Culturally Competent ...

Irena Papadopoulos - 2006 - 351 ˹
...The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. By happiness is intended pleasure, and the absence of pain; by unhappiness, pain and the privation...
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Liberty: God's Gift to Humanity

Chana B. Cox - 2006 - 285 ˹
...The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. By happiness is intended pleasure, and the absence of pain; by unhappiness, pain, and the privation...
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Past and Present

Thomas Carlyle, Joel J. Brattin, D.J. Trela - 2005 - 843 ˹
..."The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness" ( Works 10:210). Carlyle had attacked the doctrine in Sartor Resartus (2.9.142). 139.21. Herschel telescopes:...
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The Twenty Greatest Philosophy Books

James Garvey - 2006 - 181 ˹
...Certainly Mill's characterization of utilitarianism fits the mould: 'the greatest happiness principle holds that actions are right in proportion as they...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. By "happiness" is intended pleasure, and the absence of pain. . .' As Bentham argued before him, then,...
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Reforming Philosophy: A Victorian Debate on Science and Society

Laura J. Snyder - 2010 - 386 ˹
...with a definition that could have been written by Bentham himself: "The Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. By happiness is intended pleasure, and the absence of pain; by unhappiness, pain, and the privation...
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Utilitarianism EasyRead Comfort Edition

John Stuart Mill - 2006 - 120 ˹
...The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. By happiness is intended pleasure, and the absence of pain; by unhappiness, pain, and the privation...
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An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge

Dan O'Brien - 2006 - 212 ˹
...implicit consideration of the pleasure or pain experienced by the people affected by a particular action: 'actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness' (Mill, 1998, p. 7). We should not, though, simply be concerned with the immediate pleasure or pain...
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