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" The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. "
The Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas - ˹ 5
Edward Westermarck - 1906
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Troubled Waters: Religion, Ethics, and the Global Water Crisis

Gary Chamberlain - 2008 - 227 ˹
...found in balancing the pleasure and pain involved in the conflicts of ethical choices. Mill states that ". . . actions are right in proportion as they...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. By happiness is intended pleasure and the absence of pain." The criterion for decision-making then...
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Under Cover of Science: American Legal-Economic Theory and the Quest for ...

James R. Hackney - 2007 - 238 ˹
...expound on the theory, he would eventually do so in Utilitarianism.112 Mill's utilitarian rule was that "actions are right in proportion as they tend...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. By happiness are intended pleasure, and the absence of pain; by unhappiness, pain and the privation...
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Introduction to Nursing Research: Incorporating Evidence-based Practice

Carol Boswell, Sharon Cannon - 2007 - 367 ˹
...Tschudin cited John Stuart Mill (1806-1873), who described the "Greatest Happiness Principle" as "the actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. By happiness is intended pleasure and the absence of pain; by unhappiness, pain and the privation of...
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Humor in the Advertising Business: Theory, Practice, and Wit

Fred K. Beard - 2008 - 205 ˹
... which Mill called, appropriately, the principle of utility is best stated in his own words: "Actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote...happiness; wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness."37 about the problem. The golden rule is summarized in this Bible verse: "And as ye would...
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Basketball and Philosophy: Thinking Outside the Paint

Jerry Walls - 2007 - 304 ˹
...basic principle of utilitarianism the greatest-happiness principle maintains that human acts are "right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness,...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness." Utilitarianism is a consequentialist theory, since it claims that it is the consequences of one's act...
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J.S. Mill's Political Thought: A Bicentennial Reassessment

Nadia Urbinati, Alex Zakaras - 2007
...formulation of the principle of utility in Utilitarianism is classic. Mill says that the principle of utility "holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to promote the reverse of happiness" (CW X: 210). This utilitarian theory of morality is grounded in a...
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Aristotle's 'Nicomachean Ethics': A Reader's Guide

Christopher Warne - 2006 - 156 ˹
...however, the state of character is irrelevant in our assessment of the value of an action. He thinks that 'actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they intend to produce the reverse of happiness (p. 137). It is the value of the consequences of an action...
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The Philosophy of Martin Scorsese

Mark Conard - 2007 - 280 ˹
...utilitarianism is one of the most important ethical theories in the history of philosophy. Utilitarianism "holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness." That is, to act morally is to produce the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people. And,...
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Against Perfectionism: Defending Liberal Neutrality

Steven Lecce - 2008 - 348 ˹
...In Utilitarianism, Mill tells us that the 'creed' that accepts utility as the foundation of morals holds that 'actions are right in proportion as they...as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. 'n° In its classical, or Benthamite, formulation, happiness is understood as pleasure and the absence...
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Ethical Issues in Neurology

James L. Bernat - 2008 - 524 ˹
...the tendency of an act not to produce nonmoral goods, the greater is its "disutility." Mill wrote: "Actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote...happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness."10 Commonly, a given act will have complex effects, producing both harms and benefits for...
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